1996-2005 Dodge Viper GTS-R

America’s Fiercest GT Competitor.

Under the long hood of the venomous Viper lived a rather large 8.0 litre V10. The raging 10-cylinder heart of the GTS-R was naturally aspirated, featuring 2 overhead valves per cylinder, an aluminium-alloy block, aluminium head, dry sump lubrication and multipoint electronic fuel injection. The car produced a mighty 620bhp and 590 lb-ft of torque, sent to the fat rear slicks via a Borg-Warner T56 6-speed manual transmission. Famous not only for stunning endurance racing performances but also it’s unique grunt at low revs and animalistic howl up top, the Viper GTS-R is an icon of GT racing and American performance machinery.

This is one of my all-time favourite cars - and I think you'll see why!

This is one of my all-time favourite cars - and I think you'll see why!

Hidden beneath the gorgeous, super smooth, ultra-90s bodywork is a unitary steel chassis, shared with the road car. Unlike the road going counterpart’s early reputation for being somewhat unrefined, the GTS-R packed in all of the most advanced handling measures. Double wishbone suspension, coil springs, fully adjustable dampers and carbon fibre anti-roll bars. The Americans weren’t messing about. Ventilated steel discs on all four corners slowed the car, while power-assisted rack-and-pinion steering kept the thing on the asphalt. At nearly 2 meters wide, the Viper’s body incorporated a mild front splitter, low-slung side skirts and a whopping great diffuser out back. A serious GT wing looms over the rear. Like its contemporaries, the GTS-R maintained a distinctly stock appearance, sharing almost all of its looks with the road car.

It looks so good in literally any livery

It looks so good in literally any livery

On the debut 1996 Le Mans outing, the Canaska Southwind Motorsport’s Viper finished in the top 10, a mere three laps behind Gulf Racing’s GT1 McLaren F1 GTR. The car also beat Team Bigazzi SRL’s F1 GTR, driven by none Jacques Laffite, Steve Super and Marc Duez. It also outclassed a factory-run Courage C36, Nissan’s GT1-class Nismo GT-R LM, and Lister’s GT1-class Storm GTS. Even by 1998, the car was still beating Kremer K8/2 LMP1 cars, despite their GT2 classification. A truly impressive machine.

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