- Ford Escort Cosworth. This is not overrated.

4 overrated things the automotive industry sells you on that you don't need

2w ago

59.5K

These days it feels like many car models are basically a list of features drawn up by the marketing department and handed to the engineers and designers to figure out amongst themselves.

That's why we have infotainment systems with overcomplicated menus, driving assist systems that torture you with constant interruptions, volume buttons instead of knobs and even, once in a while, square cupholders.

All of this has been complained about before, but there are actually bigger fish to fry here, so let's go a little more in-depth on the *really* overrated things the automotive industry is selling us.

4. A lack of turbo lag

If you've read a review of a turbocharged car recently, you've probably read an automotive journalist complimenting the car on a lack of turbo lag, or bemoaning any sign of it. Which is fine if it's a car with low displacement that's using forced induction for economy reasons.

In an economy car, the idea is that the car is for commuting or ferrying the kids around and giving the driver a reasonably smooth driving experience is part of the expectation. However, in a turbocharged full-on sports car, or even just a performance orientated car, something is often missing. And that is the joy that a proper dose of turbo lag can bring.

On a technical level, the lack of lag is also why people wonder why their turbo powered car runs out of puff early in the rev range. To get rid of turbo lag, the turbo has to come in a lot earlier and be smaller so it can wind up faster. There are other clever ways to mitigate lag that can involve two turbos or creating that effect, but the result is younger generations who are missing the experience of wondering where all the power is until 4000 rpm before suddenly being violently shoved into the back of their seat as the world starts coming at them considerably faster.

Granted, letting the revs drop too low then accelerating out of a corner and suddenly finding you need new underwear isn't ideal, but it's all part of the experience.

3. Leather seats

Leather seats give an air of class and luxury to a car's interior. It's expensive, it looks good, and actual leather seats smell great as well. Unfortunately, in the winter they are cold to sit on when you get in the car, and in the summer they are hot all the way to your journey's end.

In a world of synthetic fibres that can be manufactured to have any qualities you want, somehow leather seats are still sought after, to the point where some luxury manufacturers don't even offer a cloth option. Which is far from ideal if you live in a part of the world where it gets very hot or very cold for a long part of the year.

As an aside, the irony here is that the vast majority of what people think are leather covered seats are, in fact, a modern vinyl. For example, Honda very carefully label their seats as 'leather trimmed', and Mercedes brands their not-leather as 'MB-Tex'. This not a bad thing as, in many ways, the plastic materials automakers use are better than leather even before you consider the fact they require little maintenance. However, they still suffer the basic too hot or too cold issue leather does.

2. Oversized wheels

This has gotten silly and the auto industry knows it. I remember watching a video recently where someone was at an auto show, and looking at a new special edition SUV, the host commented on how big the wheels were and how skinny the tires looked. The PR guy admitted that it did affect the ride quality, but they did it that way because that's the look customers want.

The big wheels thing is just as dumb on a sports car. We have the research and experience to understand that 17-inch and 18-inch wheels give us the sweet spot across grip, braking performance, steering feel, and ride comfort. The jump to 19-inch wheels takes us over the tipping point though, and the excess weight affects fuel economy, ride quality and 0-60 times negatively. That effect will vary on different sized cars, but there's always a point of diminishing returns.

1. All-wheel-drive

AWD and 4WD is all the rage right now. Even BMW has slowly but surely moved from being rear-wheel-drive only to having AWD offered across the range, and even in their pure M cars. Subaru has built its bones on AWD along with Audi, but now everyone is happy to sell you their AWD or 4WD platform for an average of about $1000 bucks extra for something you'll likely never use the potential of.

I'd rather have a Camry on four new snow tires than the best all-wheel-drive vehicle on all-season tires.

Popular Mechanics

AWD aids forward traction. That's it. Nothing more, nothing less. However, it comes with both added complexity and extra weight. So, when you see that guy in a Range Rover driving to work as if there isn't a layer of snow on the ground and assuming his 4x4 drivetrain means he's safe, steer clear.

But, even for those who want or need to go places in the snow, a set of decent snow tires on a set of spare wheels to swap around is the long term cheaper option and the short term better option. With the amazing technical levels traction control and anti-lock braking systems have reached, a set of snow tires on a 2WD vehicle is more than enough for the vast majority of people that actually have to deal with snow.

If that's true for snow, it's certainly true for rain with all-weather-tires. For those of you that occasionally go up a dirt trail a few times a year to a hiking spot or whatever, guess what? If it was that challenging, you would have bought a Jeep, Land Rover, or whatever off-road vehicle you prefer. Of course there are edge cases, but we're dealing with a generality.

What we can say with absolute certainty is the your next door neighbors that optioned their Lexus with AWD to drive to get to work and pilates now has a heavier car to both stop and start again. That means worse fuel economy as well as working through consumables such as tires and brakes faster.

"But what about improved handling?" is the cry of the enthusiasts. For those, I'll repeat: AWD aids forward traction. That's it.

AWD is great for preventing the rear-end from stepping out under power or pulling out of a corner on loose dirt but, again, that is AWD aiding acceleration. It can give you an edge in certain places but, unless you're a rally driver or doing your track days in the wet, that's added expense and weight for not a lot of return. Spend your money on high performance tires so you have better grip all-around.

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Comments (94)
  • "AWD aids forward traction. That's it. Nothing more, nothing less."

    No, that is not it. Modern AWD systems aid cornering as well, quite a lot in fact. The only place AWD does not help much is a downhill run.

    13 days ago
    2 Bumps
    • Please explain the physics of forward motion improving lateral grip.

      And, AWD helps a lot when off-roading and tackling a slippery downhill gradient.

      11 days ago
  • I want quattro because i donโ€™t need it ๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿป

    14 days ago
    3 Bumps

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