- BMW

Evening all, welcome back to my kitchen table, and to another article, in which I'll be taking a look at 7 cars that are sitting at relatively low prices on the second-hand market at the present time, but are set for a swift price increase in the next few years to come. And as this year (and indeed this decade) draws to a close, now is the perfect time to invest in this particular set of machines, as you'll be laughing all the way to the bank when the time comes to part ways with your purchase. So, without further ado, let's jump in!

7. Ford Sierra RS Cosworth (1986-1992)

Gotta love those bonnet intakes (WheelsAge)

Gotta love those bonnet intakes (WheelsAge)

Introduced in 1986 as a performance variant of Ford's not too well-received Cortina replacement, the Sierra RS Cosworth was designed for the school run and shopping centres during the week, but could also pull a sports car's trousers down at the track at the weekend. Outfitted with an engine block fiddled with by the legendary tuning house Cosworth, the new motor was capable of churning out a good 204 bhp, bringing the car to a top speed of around 150 mph. Yet despite this frankly amazing performance and handling pedigree, excellent examples sit at around only £15,000, incredible considering this car's amazing capabilities, ans as a result these cars are set for growth, as the price is beginning to rise slowly even now, and it's only a matter of time before we see a sharp spike in value. Moving on..

6. Jaguar XJS (1975-1996)

I see that an Agatha Christie garden was used as a background (Jaguar)

I see that an Agatha Christie garden was used as a background (Jaguar)

You might remember this car from an early episode of Top Gear, in which it was stripped of its unnecessary fats and fitted with nitrous oxide before being pitted against some of the fastest supercars in the world (at the time), and was then subjected to a watery end off the ramp of an aircraft carrier. Well, it's a shame that they did that, as they could have been in to make a tidy bundle in the next few years, as examples sitting on the virtual dealer's forecourt will be likely to only cost you around £6,000 for a low-mileage, well-kept example. Fitted with a V12 (which most people these days tend to stay away from) the prices declined briefly due to the drop in demand, however over the last few years prices of earlier examples and special edition versions (chiefly the "Celebration" model) have seen a sharp increase, up to around £18,000, which is a reflection of how much the car is beginning to rise in value.

5. Audi 100 (1983-1991)

Didn't know Michael Bolton's hair was used for testing aerodynamics (Audi)

Didn't know Michael Bolton's hair was used for testing aerodynamics (Audi)

In the 1970s, despite all of their rugged dependability and slab-sided sturdiness, Audis were about as good at cutting through the air as butter is at cementing bricks together. However that was all to change in 1983, when Audi learned of "aerodynamics" and used this concept to introduce the sleek, slippery 100, which was designed to slice through the air like a python on an oil slick. Audi were in fact so proud of this design that they put a little sticker in the window that read the mysterious figure "cd 0.30" which when deciphered, translated to the 100's drag factor were it in a wind tunnel. As you'd expect, due to the uniqueness of this car, combined with its reliability and good looks, the prices are starting to ascend, but thankfully for now they're still languishing in the lower region, with a few good examples only costing you around £18,000, however don't expect that price to stay there for that long, as a car this distinctive and unique will be snapped up very quickly very soon. Best get a move on then..

4. Porsche 924 (1976-1988)

Of course, this paint scheme makes it priceless (COYS of London)

Of course, this paint scheme makes it priceless (COYS of London)

The result of a joint venture between Volkswagen and Porsche, there was originally a Volkswagen version of what eventually became the 924 to be offered. Unfortunately it never materialised, but luckily we received one of the finest cheap Porsches on the market for years to come. However, it appears that the days of picking up a good quality 924 for peanuts may be gone for good, as if you want a 924 in good condition these days, you'd best be prepared to pay a couple of thousand for one, around £3,000 to be precise, and rising fast, despite the fact that it was powered with the same engine unit found in a VW van. However, the car above may have had a part to play in the price increase..

3. BMW E34 M5 (1988-1995)

One of the finest sleepers possibly? (WheelsAge)

One of the finest sleepers possibly? (WheelsAge)

One of the best looking generations of BMWs in my opinion, this car looks like a normal 5 Series accountant's saloon at first glances, but have a closer look at the front grille bearing the M Power legend and you'll realise that you're dealing with a machine with a lot of bite under the bonnet. Speaking of the bonnet, open it up and you'll find a true monster- a naturally-aspirated 6-cylinder engine pushing out 315 bhp (uprated to a staggering 340 bhp for the 1992 model year) with a 0-60 time of 6.3 seconds, making it a fearsome machine. Price ranges for these cars are a little higher in terms of second-hand buying- expect to pay around £10,000 for a low-mileage, well-looked after version-but this is one car that is in for a sharp injection of desirability in years to come, and therefore a sharp price increase.

2. Peugeot 405 Mi16 (1988-1997)

Back when Peugeot were known for making fizzy, pocket-sized hatchbacks and small saloons to blow your socks off and leave you in the weeds, the 405 Mi16 saloon was introduced when Peugeot were at their absolute peak. Fitted with a small, tasteful 80s bodykit, the Mi16 was more than just good looks-underneath the bonnet nestled a 4-cylinder Peugeot engine with 158 horses crammed into it, which when paired with its sprightly handling and light weight made it a stunner to drive, shooting to 100 kph in about 8.6 seconds, brilliant for a car of its size. Despite this, you can pick one up for only about £8,000, but expect that number to rise accordingly in the next few years, and grab one quickly while you can. Onto number one then..

1. Lotus Elise Series One (1996-2001)

Here it is then: the car which you should definitely pick up soon before the prices shoot for the sky. Released in 1996 to rapturous praise and adoration, the Elise Series One brought its maker a well-deserved new wave of relevance and desirability, all while being a great-looking, fast and sporty roadster at that. The real genius in its method was its extremely light weight- making it capable of a 0-60 time of a blistering 5.8 seconds, amazing considering it had a relatively low power figure of only 118 bhp. This in turn makes the handling crisp and offers a brilliant driving sensation, and makes it a truly unique car, and one which defined the late 90s roadster movement. Pick one of these up for the not-too-shabby price of around £12,000, and this car will blow your face off with its performance, and when the time comes to part ways in the future, you'll have yourself with a nice large sum for your future classic.

And that's a wrap! Thanks so much for reading, and I'll see you in the next article!

LW

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