- (Images courtesy of bpj07 on eBay)

A Challenger of a Different Shade

This special-order 1970 Challenger R/T was painted in non-production color.

I dig cars off the beaten path. I recently wrote about a 1969 Fairlane 500 with a 428 Cobra Jet, which stuck out because most cars built with that engine were Cobras or Torino GTs. While this 1970 Challenger R/T convertible on eBay appears to be part of the mainstream, there's something very unique about it: it's painted in a color not available for Challengers.

Silver was a regular-production color for full-size Dodges, so it's quite possible the original buyer saw a Polara on the showroom floor and, when (s)he determined the color wasn't available for the Challenger, (s)he decided to shell out some sheckels for special paint. Back then, the cost was generally $100.

Even without the special-order color, this Challenger R/T convertible is a standout. Only 1,026 Challenger R/T convertibles were built in total, of which 963 were built for the US. Of those, 163 came with the 375-horsepower 440 Magnum, which was rated at 375 horsepower. This was the same engine standard on the Coronet R/T and Charger R/T.

The 999 code reflects a special-order color. Y39 is a general code reflecting special-order status.

The 999 code reflects a special-order color. Y39 is a general code reflecting special-order status.

A black bumblebee stripe (V9X) appears on the fender tag, but the hood blackout (V21) does not, so possibly it was added during the repaint. In fact, considering the Challenger was repainted, it's possible that the car was built in another non-production color and repainted in Silver – does someone know if the original color can be determined by the build sheet? – but Silver seems to be quite popular among special-order color Dodges in 1970.

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Comments (1)

  • Interesting. For some classic cars - like the Holden FX or the Model T Ford, it's pretty easy to spot an unoriginal colour.

      1 year ago
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