- Photo by Kevin Mueller on Unsplash

Last Summer I was wandering the streets of Belgrade and found an old, beat-up Defender parked near a house. It was in terrible nick, the body was full of scratches and dents, the wheels were rusty, the tyres were damn near flat, and the interior was full of junk. It was unclear whether the car was still being used but it definitely wasn't well looked after.

Now this being 2019, I broke out of my phone, took a picture and sent it to my friend Sarah who owns a Defender 90 300tdi, she texted me back saying, "They're always beautiful. Any Defender is a good Defender".

my friend's Defender, she calls it "Maggie"

my friend's Defender, she calls it "Maggie"

Sarah owns the 90 pictured above, and she has also owned a 110, so I'm assuming she knows a thing or two about this British classic and this has got me thinking.

The original Defender was developed in the 80s but it traces its roots back to the Land Rover series introduced in 1948. Production was halted in 2016 and that means it has been sold, pretty much unchanged, for 68 years running. It has enjoyed a long and varied life and it has been driven by just about anyone just about anywhere for any purpose. This gave this bona fide off-roader a reputation for dependability and durability that few other vehicles can match.

Photographed with my iPhone 6s in Queen's Park, London - today

Photographed with my iPhone 6s in Queen's Park, London - today

I guess this changed the way we look at it. It's like we expect it to come with a few bumps and bruises, in the same way some people think scars give you character. All in all, I believe my friend Sarah was right, there's no such thing as a Defender in "bad" nick.

Would you agree? Let me in the comments.

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