Back from the dead!

Knock, knock! Who's there? cylinder 2!!

4y ago
3.1K

Thanksgiving morning, I go to start the car, and... nothing happens. "Oh, great! Dead battery!"

Sure enough, AP reveals low voltage.

Sure enough, AP reveals low voltage.

So, I see one of the Port of Seattle's finest. Wave him over to my parked car. "Can you jump me, I ask?" --' Nope, says the Officer. will fry my computers. Have a nice day!' And off he goes.

Okay fine.. I call my insurance roadside assistance, and 20 minutes later, he arrives.

We jump the car, and still no joy..

Won't jump!

Won't jump!

Nothing happens.. Car still reveals low voltage. So, he advises we sit for awhile and wait. In short, it takes another 45 minutes of trying and waiting for the car to start!

Immediately after the car starts, we hear what sounds like dry lifters, and its code-palooza!

Hrm.. I'm sure it's fine, lets clear and go home!

Hrm.. I'm sure it's fine, lets clear and go home!

But.. The noise subsides, and with the car running, and turkey waiting, I decide to drive home. All is well, car feels nimble and quick. I start to daydream about stretch pants and how many pieces of pie I'll eat tonight..

Oh great! that tailgater decided to take the same exit I'm taking!

I'll just accelerate and leave him in my...

KABOOM!

KABOOM!

The engine literally felt like it lifted from its motor mounts, slamming down hard! I can no longer see the fella who so desperately wanted to draft behind me who is completely engulfed within my dirty smoke screen. Only the noise of my exploding engine and a horn wailing from behind can be heard.

The poor little car managed to make it off the freeway and into a Tukwila parking lot. Thinking of Michael and the drags last month, I knew immediately what happened..

life blood spilled!

life blood spilled!

It's Thanksgiving morning, and there's nothing I can do about it now, except make a few calls.

Tow truck arrives and the driver does the 360 around the car. You can literally see his thoughts as he tries to figure out how to tow the lowered ST.

In desperation, I offer up the tow strap, knowing it probably won't work.

Sure enough.. *sigh*

8,000 lb rated strap.

8,000 lb rated strap.

"Use the bumper tow ring, its welded!" I say..

Hurray, closer to turkey now!

Hrm.. So, slight problem with the tow ring. Turns out the center of the bumper isn't the 'strongest' hardpoint for a tow ring. I probably should have done more research, but then again, both the strap and ring were designed to get you off of a flat track and back to the paddock. Not hauled up an extreme angle such as this.

tow ring pulled bumper out a bit.

tow ring pulled bumper out a bit.

Okay fine.. The car is home, now what! Who's doing the work? I call several shops, leave messages, it's a holiday afterall.

After posting on our Facebook page, Nathan Linderkamp puts on his red cape and offers up his assistance! Yay!

Some of you may know Nathan. He's been with the group for awhile. Drives a highly modified Tangerine Scream Focus ST.

Oh, AND! he's a tuner for Rebel Devil! So quiet, Nathan... :)

Nathan and friends were sharing a garage at one of the DIY places down in Graham. Unfortunately, that fell through and the poor guy had to work from his exposed barn. Mind you, the weather at the time was in the teens and there was snow on the ground when we dropped the car off. Nathan wouldn't quit though.

(One thing I've learned about Nathan after all of this is if he says he's going to do something.. He does it!)

Nathan and his friend Zack, start tearing into the car.

And find, a hole in in the front of the crankcase about the size of a half dollar in front of cylinder #2

Front crankcase hole.

Front crankcase hole.

Almost all of the valves are full of water and oil.

valve

valve

After prying frozen tools off the ground, Nathan and co. remove the old engine and find 'another' hole on the back of the crankcase off of the same cylinder!

With the old engine out, we can see a second hole covering the turbo oil return inlet.

With the old engine out, we can see a second hole covering the turbo oil return inlet.

Rear crankcase hole.

Rear crankcase hole.

Something missing?

Something missing?

While Nathan was enjoying the weather, I was doing the hard work. Trying to find a new engine!

Sitting at my desk, sipping lukewarm coffee (ugh!) I start to search. Sometime later, Alex from Stratified sends me a text saying the Ford Fusion engine is compatible and because it's a 'Fusion' and not an 'ST' it's cheaper. Installing another used engine with all the modifications means 'reduced longevity.' Interesting..

I figure I have 4 choices (oh there are probably more, but these will suffice as an example of where my head was at the time.) 1) replace with used engine, part out all the modifications and go back to stock. 2) replace with stock crated engine for around $2,000, keep the mods, and suffer reduced longevity. 3) buy a used long block, forged internals and have a machine shop build it for me to match the power output from the modifications 4) Roll it off a cliff!

Jacob Manley notices on one of the Ford Focus Facebook for sale forums a brand new forged internals engine by speedperf6rmanc3 is up for sale by someone I have personally dealt with in the past. This person had a custom built engine shipped, but never installed it and was selling for 1,000.00 less than he paid for it! Nice!

Well then! In for a penny, in for a pound!"

The new engine utilizes forged aluminum pistons rated at 800HP. The overall build is rated at 550HP, and comes with the following internals:

Pistons: 2618 Mahle 9.3:1 ,
Connecting Rods: Molnar H-Beam,
Rod Bolts: ARP 2000,
ARP Head Studs: 10mm L19,
Coated Clevite H-Series main and rod bearings,
Balance Shaft Delete,
Keyed Crank Pulley & Sprockets Bolts: ARP 2000,
ARP Head Studs: 10mm L19,
Rocket launchers,
Bullet proof windows,
Coated Clevite H-Series main and rod bearings,
Balance Shaft Delete,
Keyed Crank Pulley & Sprockets.

2.0L Ford Focus ST by http://www.speedperf6rmanc3.com/

2.0L Ford Focus ST by http://www.speedperf6rmanc3.com/

Turbo side

Turbo side

passenger side

passenger side

Transmission side.

Transmission side.

So long as we're in there, I might as well upgrade the clutch and flywheel kit with a Spec 2+ (rated to 545 foot pounds of torque )

Spec 2+ with lightweight flywheel

Spec 2+ with lightweight flywheel

This particular kit did NOT come with flywheel bolts or alignment tool. I specifally remember calling cjponyparts who told me they came with the bolts! The bolts from Ford are $15.00 a piece you'll need 6. (tip: we found them at edgeauto for $1.38) Oh Ford! You so silly!!

Nathan advised wisely that I should replace the clutch slave cylinder and release bearing as well. Also purchased through edgeauto.

The new engine came with a PVC plate and required the use of a catch can. So, I bought one by Mishimoto. Unfortunately, it wasn't compatible with the plate, so we (and when I say 'we', I mean Nathan and Zack) swapped the sp63 plate out with the OEM plate and PVC valve, then installed the catch can using the PVC lines.

Mishimoto oil cooler

Mishimoto oil cooler

I also provided a new serpentine belt (from Napa,) and a few replacement o ring gaskets such as the fuel pump and thermostat housing gaskets (from www.oemfordpart.com/) And a new duralast battery.

With the new engine prepped, it's time to install the clutch and flywheel and put it into place.

New engine prepped.

New engine prepped.

New engine and cooling stack installed

new engine and cooling stack installed.

new engine and cooling stack installed.

Almost ready!

Hood installation and done

Hood installation and done

Nathan and Zack fire her up!

Play video
0:44

First start!

Nathan drives it out of the barn and parks it. I sleep restlessly awaiting the morning's test drive.

Nathan drives it out of the barn and parks it. I sleep restlessly awaiting the morning's test drive.

Everything went really well. Nathan found a small leak in the oil cooler, removed the bumper and fixed it the following morning. Then he drove it to work the next day, where he received a code on the accessport about the the crank sensor out of sync with the engine. Apparently, it's adjustable +/- 5 degrees, with a special tool by Ford (of course.) I haven't seen the code myself.

Zack took it to his shop and refilled the AC, pressure washed the engine, and as a bonus, washed the car! Super!!

We all met at Buffalo Wild Wings for the key hand off and a congratulatory dinner. Michael and Colleen came down to help us celebrate. Good times!

Michael (left), Nathan (center), Zack (leaning back, right), me smiling like a giddy child (right), Colleen (photographer)

Michael (left), Nathan (center), Zack (leaning back, right), me smiling like a giddy child (right), Colleen (photographer)

Post install - So, I've driven the car for about 200 miles now. Completed its first 100 mile oil change. Oil looked good coming out, very clean. The only issues so far is a muffler/exhaust and a BOV full of old oil. Due to 'break in' restrictions, I cannot exceed 3500 RPM's for the first 300 miles or use the turbo (at all) for the first 1000 miles! So, the slow burn of old oil will take a while.

This morning, I managed to pop off the transmission side radiator hose losing 1.4 gallons of fluid. Without thinking, I pulled out my phone and called poor Nathan on his day off. "Good morning, Nathan!" The hose clamp is actually a spring clip on the ST. Very strange, you pull up on the spring clamp using the tip of a screw driver, or maybe some needle nose pliers, then press the hose firmly onto the male end of the radiator, then press the clip down over the hose. Odd setup..

The break in process is interesting (I think anyways.) It's actually two break in periods. One for the engine, the other for the clutch. Both require 1000 miles of city stop and go driving. Its designed to work the clutch into the flywheel evenly so that you don't have scorches or uneven wear between the two, and the piston rings to wear away at the rough cylinder wall edges, meshing together gradually. Lots of write ups all over the internet on this. Its fairly easy to limit yourself to 3500 RPMs, but i've noticed climbing hills, etc., the it's nearly impossible not to completely deny the turbo.

So, the drama didn't end there.. While attending cars and coffee event at Griots car care company, we noticed an oil sheen underneath the car. We suspected one of the oil cooler lines. Unfortunately, that wasn't it.

Giant hole in the cold charge pipe

Giant hole in the cold charge pipe

Jacob Manley noticed a large hole in the JBR cold charge pipe, worn away by vibration and rubbing against the cross frame.

Water and oil found in the Front Mount Intercooler (FMIC)

Water and oil found in the Front Mount Intercooler (FMIC)

Jacob also found oil and water mix within the FMIC. Our theory is that rain water off the road was drawn through the hole in the charge pipe via vacuum, then mixed with old oil accumulated from the blown engine. Please note that the car is still undergoing its break in period and we can't push the car hard.

Internals degreased, pressure washed, and set to dry.

Internals degreased, pressure washed, and set to dry.

More water and oil mix found in the blow off valve.

More water and oil mix found in the blow off valve.

Shiny and clean once again.

Shiny and clean once again.

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