Bigger is not always better.

2y ago

3K

It's a common male belief amongst riders that the capacity of a bike's engine is directly proportional to the size of their schnitzel. All males grow up with the concept of 'bigger is better'. In turn, this concept is applied to our Johnson and onto our plums. After that it's a short journey to the size of our bike's engine. And so goes the male development process.

All males grow up with the concept of 'bigger is better'. In turn, this concept is applied to our Johnson and onto our plums. After that it's a short journey to the size of our bike's engine.

Ben Fulljames

This reality makes pulling up at the lights next to another biker a varied experience (depending on the capacity of your bike). We have all been there. Imagine a Kawasaki Ninja 300 pulls up next to Ducati 1299 Superleggera at a set of lights. At this point the Ninja 300's rider has lost all self confidence. He feels inferior in every way. It's like a dingy pulling up to an Aircraft Carrier or a Cessna pulling up to an A380. He knows in the eyes of everyone around him that he has been totally overshadowed.

The question remains: how do you respond when the lights go green? You have two options in my eyes. Firstly, submit and wallow in newfound inferiority. Concede to the bigger bike. Abandon the minimal sense of manhood you have left. The second option, my personal favourite, is give the bike everything it has. Shank the crank, choke the throttle, beat the street - after all, it's not about how big it is, it's about how you use it. At least that's what she said....

Since the dawn of time men have been obsessed with oversized 'things'. The first recorded images of men liking big 'things' include the hieroglyphs of the Egyptians. Not much has changed. We still haven't realised the errors of our ways. You can fix that. Get out there and use what you've got.

The angry 2017 Kawasaki z900.

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