BMW chief says firm is committed to internal combustion for "at least 30 years"

But the flagship V12 won't make it, and the V8 might follow

1y ago
30.5K

Klaus Froehlich, head of research and development at BMW, recently confirmed that the brand has no intention of ditching internal combustion for quite some time.

In a recent interview with Auto News Europe, he said that “our four- and six-cylinder diesels will remain for at least another 20 years, and our gasoline units for at least 30 years.”

That's fantastic news for fans of some of BMW's fantastic engines, but some of them won't be around that long.

Several of the engines throughout the entire BMW Group are already getting cut. The quad-turbo diesel from the BMWs 750d and M550d will both go, because according to Froelich, "it is too expensive and difficult to build with its four turbos." So will the 1.5-liter 3-cylinder diesel found in the Mini Cooper D, among other vehicles.

The Mini Cooper D, using the soon-to-be-cut 1.5-liter 3-cylinder diesel engine

The Mini Cooper D, using the soon-to-be-cut 1.5-liter 3-cylinder diesel engine

The flagship V12 engine is on the verge of suffering the same fate. Froelich revealed that "the V12 might not have a future" because only a few units are produced per year and "the several thousand euros of added cost it takes to make them compliant with stricter emissions rules." However, the engine should last at least as far as the M760Li, which isn't due for replacement until 2023.

The BMW M760Li holds on to the flagship V12, and should until at least 2023

The BMW M760Li holds on to the flagship V12, and should until at least 2023

Even the flagship twin-turbo V8 might not have much longer. Froelich commented on the "difficult business case" keeping it presented, given BMW's possession of a six-cylinder high-performance plug-in hybrid engine that makes 600 horsepower and has "enough torque to destroy many transmissions.”

So BMW is keeping the internal combustion engine a part of their portfolio for many years to come. However, the best of those engines probably won't be a part of it.

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Comments (32)

  • I just hope they don’t make the grills any bigger, please BMW, please!

      1 year ago
  • Don't care how complex an ice is, they are way better for other reasons besides emissions

      1 year ago
  • That’s great news

      1 year ago
  • Lol, I have been saying for a while now that internal combustion vehicles (including hybrids) will retain at least a significant portion of the auto market into the 2060s and likely even beyond. Those that want others to buy in to their desire for an all-electric future are finally beginning to come down to reality and admit that electric vehicles will not totally supplant internal combustion vehicles for many, many decades, if ever. Instead, they will gain market share, certainly, and many people over time will purchase an electric vehicle. Internal combustion vehicle numbers will decline, but will still represent at least 50% of registered vehicles even in 40 years--quite a decline, but still very much alive. The other 50% will be mostly EVs, but there may also be a few more CNG and and hydrogen vehicles, as well. EVs have a bright future, but will not have the monopoly that futurists want you to believe.

      1 year ago
    • Also the infrastructure for a full EV conversion isn't there yet. There are 443 Tesla Supercharger locations in the United States, compared to 168,000 gas stations.

        1 year ago
  • Can't argue with numbers, when you look at the number of parts in an ICE compared to electric drivetrain, it makes sense to turn the ship that way. Sad but that's where things are going.

      1 year ago
    • you're ignoring the batteries though. EV is simpler in every way because the complexity is wrapped up in the battery - but unwrap it, and it's less simple than ICE.

      When you car needed repair the last time, what was it? In my experience,...

      Read more
        1 year ago
    • It is indeed a simplistic way to look at it, but it is an easy measure of complexity. An ICE has hundreds more individual components (and sully chain for each) compared to an electric motor. Sure, the EV shifts the challenge, complexity and...

      Read more
        1 year ago
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