- Bonhams.com

The Turbo, all wing and wide arches, might be the 911 that best sums up the 1980s. But it wasn't the best 1980s 911.

That was the Carrera Club sport, and it turns 30 this year, as does another far less well known Clubbie.

The famous one: the Carrera Club Sport

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

Like the later 968 Club Sport, the 911 CS ditched unnecessary junk like the back seat to save weight. There was a simplified heating system manual sports seats and no radio, fog lamps, sunroof or rear wiper.

But while the 968’s engine stayed stock, the stripped Carrera’s had goodies like hollow intake valves and a taller rev limiter. Despite this, Porsche claimed the same 231hp as it did for the basic Carrera. Hmm.

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

Capable of a genuine 150mph and 0-60mph in just over 5sec, only the Turbo was faster among 1980s 911s. But of the two, only the CS could claim a spiritual connection to the old 2.7 RS.

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

They weren't all white white with the red stripes and wheels, by the way, though that's how most of us imagine them. That was the colour scheme reaching out to me as a kid from the car mags vying for my pocket money.

Porsche built just 340 Clubbies, including 53 right-hookers for the UK, and even by the crazy standards of current old-Porsche prices, they’re worth a fortune.

The car pictured here was in the catalogue for Bonhams' Bond Street sale last December with an estimate of £180-220k ($235-287k).

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The forgotten one: the 928 Club sport

That much you probably already knew, but did you know Porsche also made a 928 Club Sport? Yep, 30 year ago Porsche produced a limited run of 17 CS 928s out of its V8 GT bruiser by following the same recipe.

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

And it kicked off the programme in 1987, a year before customer deliveries started, by giving five to its works drivers, including Derek Bell.

The weight of the production cars was reduced from 1640kg to 1450kg by removing electrical gear like the seat motors, thinning out the sound deadening, simplifying the wiring loom and removing the passenger door mirror.

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

As for what was under the bonnet, Porschearchive.com claims the 928 S4’s 5.0-litre V8 gained higher lift cams and a revised ECU, increasing the rev limit to 6775rpm and pushing power from the stock 320hp to 330hp.

But looking back at some contemporary magazine tests suggests that version of the 5.0-litre V8 didn’t arrive until the 928 GT a year later, and the 928 Clubbies stuck with the S4’s 330hp lump.

Whatever power it produced, it was sent to a limited-slip rear end through a compulsory manual gearbox. Naturally the suspension was tweaked too, its stiffer springs and dampers connected to wide forged alloy wheels.

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

Bonhams.com

According to Bonham’s auction house, which sold Bell’s old CS for £226k ($296k) last year, the pre-prod cars featured a higher spec including a full leather interior and passenger door mirror.

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Which means they’re more like the 42 SE cars Porsche sold in the UK in 1988 – the CS was left-hand drive only, and not sold in the Britain.



What’s the Club Sport badge up to these days? It was last seen earlier this year denoting a track-only package available on the mega Cayman GT4.

Tags: #porsche #cayman #911 #968 #928 #s4 #928s4 #928gt #928gts #clubbie #clubsport #club-sport

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