- Bet you can hear the theme song in your head now…

Feel the Sting!

Our co-founder, Lance Müller felt the sting when GT Spirit sent us the latest release of the Shelby GT500 with a unique story behind it.

Sorry. Not that one. Nor that stupid movie in 2011 either.

During the 1960s, the “Golden Age” of American Muscle, Carroll Shelby was already a legend. Having produced Cobras and given Ford the opportunity to beat Ferrari at Le Mans with the iconic GT40, he was given carte blanche to create all sorts of goodies. In the waning days of the decade, he had come up with some nifty, new-for-then, ideas. Fuel injection was still on the board, independent rear suspension wasn’t a thing yet and disc brakes on all four wheels wasn’t exactly standard. And he needed something to test them on.

The 68 Mustang Shelby GT500 (The Green Hornet) next to the 67 Mustang Shelby (Little Red) Images from the Barrett-Jackson media library

The 68 Mustang Shelby GT500 (The Green Hornet) next to the 67 Mustang Shelby (Little Red) Images from the Barrett-Jackson media library

Shelby had already had a test mule for his ideas. Dubbed Little Red, a 1967 Mustang Notchback. But his friend Bill Cosby had other ideas. He spent time driving it around and showing it off. He even used it to convince Lee Iacocca to say okay to the Mustang GT/California Special.

So Shelby needed another piece of rolling stock to cram the goodies he was working on. The fuel injection system and the rear suspension parts needed to put in a real car. This came in the form of a 68 Lime Gold hardtop with a 390/C6 which was immediately replaced with the so-new-it-was-still-on-the-board 428CJ that was connected to a fresh Conelec electronic fuel-injection unit that was created by Dave Long. This monster give some amazing numbers. A 0-60 in 5.7 seconds and a top speed of 157mph (250kmph). For a car in the 60s! After its testing, and usefulness, it was consigned to be crushed, but luckily ended up in the Ford Employee Auction and Resale Lot. Then after a few hands changing and with several rebuilds, it ended up with Craig Jackson, chairman/CEO of Barrett-Jackson , one of the few Fords in his very distinctive personal collection. He managed to get it as close as possible to the original as it could be. Hemmings has great article on it.

Back to the Future (You have no idea how long I have waited to use that in an article). What you see before you is the GT Spirit Shelby Mustang GT500 1:18 replica of the model that bears the VIN# CS0001, which was won by Craig Jackson for a cool $1.1m bid. He wanted his painted in the same Emerald green and badged as the original “Green Hornet”. He got the magic makers at BASF and Penske to match it to the original, using a Lime Green base layered with Candy Apple upper layers. The car featured a 5.2l supercharged V8 that puts out something in the region 760 horses. Its rumored to do 0-60 mph in under 4 seconds and can do almost 133 mph (215 kmph) thereabouts.

Truly the visage of a monster – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

Truly the visage of a monster – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

GT Spirit has lovingly recreated this monster to the last detail. And when it comes to their models, its all the way or no-go. Covered in a deep Emerald green, and features the EXP500 white stripe long the lower flanks. Rolling (yes it actually rolls) on 7-spoke glossy black rims. You can see the mega disk brakes with the red Brembo calipers on the wheels. Carbon fibre spoiler, air intake louvre, air dams, front lip and side skirts. The etchings and engravings are on point. You can see Shelby logo on the front lip and the EXP500 on the front grille dam.

Details?!? Its by GT Spirit… I don’t need to explain details – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

Details?!? Its by GT Spirit… I don’t need to explain details – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

The one we received is as factory fresh as can be. Its a truly lush model, and a fitting centerpiece to your collection. Knowing collectors, this will vanish into their collections faster than you can say “Mustang Shelby!” And it will certainly sting if you don’t get your hands on this piece of automotive history.

the flowing lines just cut through the ether – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

the flowing lines just cut through the ether – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

The carbon fibre details are like what now!!?! – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

The carbon fibre details are like what now!!?! – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

The carbon fibre details are like what now!!?! – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

The carbon fibre details are like what now!!?! – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

Yeah it’s another photo of the front. What, are you going to complain? – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

Yeah it’s another photo of the front. What, are you going to complain? – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

These wheels actually do roll. Take it out of the box and out for a spin -Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

These wheels actually do roll. Take it out of the box and out for a spin -Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

Another photo, just for kicks, actually couldn't stop photographing this beauty – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

Another photo, just for kicks, actually couldn't stop photographing this beauty – Photo by Lance K Müller for Castheads Magazine

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