- Provided by Chrono24

Flagship Watches Need A Broader Size Range

Inspired by Cara Benett's "All Watches Should be Unisex" feature on Hodinkee

2w ago
11.7K

Sigh, let’s face it, I have a child's wrist. There’s just no getting around it, no amount of stuffing my face with peanut butter, Nutella, and syrup-drenched pancakes made with mass gainer instead of flour is going to change that. I did one of those BMI test kits where you wrap a band around your wrist when I was in high school and my score was unidentifiable. My wrist was literally so small that the band went such a short distance around my wrist it didn’t even show up on any of the colored bits. Even worse, I have forever had an affinity for watch designs of the larger persuasion. Take that beauty 300M Divers Tokyo 2020 SeaMaster pictured above. To me that’s the epitome of daily wear watch design that strikes a flair without being too flashy, it’s the perfect blend of my favorite colorways, white and blue, with a wonderful textured finish of the trademark waves that denote a SeaMaster. But, yes there’s a but. It looks absolutely gigantic on my wrist like someone shrunk down a planet but didn’t have enough juice in the shrink ray to reduce it small enough for stupid ass wrist.

Provided by Monochrome Watches

Provided by Monochrome Watches

But hey this isn’t just about my wrist, this is about all wrists; small or big, male or female or otherwise. Why do watch manufacturers insist on producing watches only for plus-sized wrists or in the cases of something like a Rolex Date Just something too small for a bigger lad? Loving a design has no boundary for how burly or dainty your wrist happens to be. My favorite watch in my collection design-wise is my IWC Portugeiser that I stole from my brother's collection and he hasn’t realized yet (keep that on the hush). The only problem is every time I wear it feels like an anchor dragging me down into a swirling abyss, sticking out like a sore thumb in a blatant mismatched ratio of skin to steel.

My proposition is thus; always develop in threes. Say Omega releases a new SeaMaster Diver at a case size of 43mm. That’s a fairly large circumference with noticeable heft carried on the wrist. It’s never something I would be able to wear, not just because of how large the face is relative to my wrist but also the surface area will cover the majority of wrist pinching the bracelet around and not sitting flush on my hand, it’s a very awkward way to wear a watch especially on a steel bracelet. If the new SeaMaster was built with a ‘develop in threes’ design brief, it could reach a much larger set of audiences. I would go 43, 41, and 38. That’s a good range that doesn’t impede on the quality or finishing of the watch whilst being a bit more accessible to the skinny wrist gang. Anything in the top end of the ’30s can work at a pinch for me at least. I know they’re generally designed to be bigger watches but at least give the option. It’s like PDK vs Manual in Porsches, not everyone gets the manual but it’s very satisfying to know it’s there.

Provided by Watch My Diamonds

Provided by Watch My Diamonds

The best in the business right now for size range has to be Rolex, their date just series ranges from 36mm to 41mm and has a place for both men and women both in material, finish, and overall design. If other manufacturers are worried there won’t be enough deer to the water, try it in limited numbers if you’re hesitant on how the market will respond but at least give us the option. Just let my skinny little arms wear whatever my eyes keep drooling over.

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Comments (17)

  • It seems to me that people are becoming increasingly drawn to smaller watches, the oversized timepiece era seems to be over (thank God). But it’s also true that most focus on case size when lug-to-lug and the way lugs are designed play a huuuuuuuuuge part in the way the watch wears. The Casioak is a great example of that, it is a lot larger than it looks because it’s so thin and because of the integrated lugs

      14 days ago
    • Totally agree, there’s a watch argh it’s escaping me (it’s a micro) but exactly to your point that lugs make a huge difference to the fit.

        14 days ago
  • I feel you - my wrists are small; 36mm is my ideal size I'd say. However I prefer dress watches to sport watches, so I do fine.

      14 days ago
    • I’d say the same, 36-39 is ideal for me. Do you still though? Maybe it’s just my dads taste but all the dress watches that have either been gifted or handed down are still chunk on me, take the Franck Muller Master Banker I got when I got my first...

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        14 days ago
    • So I have three - one 36, one 39 (but quite round so it looks petite) and a 41. Which is bigger than I’d choose, but I forgive it anything because it’s dark green.

        14 days ago
  • Opinion: flagship watches need a broader size range @tribe

      14 days ago
  • Completely agree with you. I’m far from a watch expert but I absolutely love the Rolex Oyster Perpetual 39mm.... but that model has since been axed meaning you can either go for the 41mm, which is a bit too big for a watch like the Oyster Perp in my opinion, or the 36mm which is just too small for most people.

    I mean between these, I’d definitely go for the 41mm but I still wish they had the 39mm.

    Great article.

      13 days ago
  • I have the Omega sea master and Omega speed master. Both are in a small size as i have small wrists. My sea master had a choice of three sizes and i found the 36mm perfect for me. My speed master tripple date is 38mm.

      14 days ago
    • Oh very cool. Should look into that, I particularly wanted the Tokyo 2020 Seamaster which only came in 40mm plus but I do have a Speedmaster reduced in 36mm and it’s a beauty.

        14 days ago
    • I am wearing my Omega Aqua Terra right now that is 48.5mm and without a big bezel it is a good size on me but the strap looks anemic. It is my only dress type watch as I collect tool watches.

        13 days ago
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