Whenever I'm not working, out with friends, driving, or even messing around with my models, I love getting comfortable and watching a Bond movie. I've always been a devout fan of all the normal movies in the series. Although I'm a shill for Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, and Pierce Brosnan, there's no denying the Connery movies are good. Except for Never Say Never Again. But then again, we don't talk about that.

I've always been an avid fan of the Bond series. I watched my first movie, The Spy Who Loved Me, when I was 10. I fell madly in love with the movies from 1977 to 1997, what I personally consider the golden age for Bond movies. Although I loved those, I also found a liking for certain Connery movies. As I grew up, I realized I deeply disliked Connery and the movies as a whole, but they certainly had their moments.

T​he main redeeming features of the Connery era are the terrible puns and exquisite cars featured in the movies. The jury's out as to which is better. I've purchased two of the most iconic cars from his movies to compare. Although this is a comparison of the cars themselves, I'll gladly compare aspects of the movies. This was an era where Ford paid for product placement in their movies starting with 1964's Goldfinger. Hot Wheels has a deal with Danjaq to be able to make officially licensed toy versions of the real cars from the movies, so naturally, I had to buy two.

Y​ou look a little pale, Mr. Bond. I hope I didn't frighten you.

Y​ou look a little pale, Mr. Bond. I hope I didn't frighten you.

T​he first Mustang I'll showcase is admittedly the second iteration of a Ford Mustang that was used by an important character. The very first one was a 1964.5 Mustang Convertible in Wimbledon White over Red vinyl as featured in Goldfinger. This one is the 1965 Mustang Convertible in Tropical Turquoise over White vinyl from Thunderball as driven by Fiona Volpe.

W​ell, you see, I've always been a nervous passenger.

W​ell, you see, I've always been a nervous passenger.

I​n the scene where Volpe drives it, she picks up Bond off the side of the road and proceeds to drive through the Bahamian back roads in excess of 100 mph at night. Sadly, this Hot Wheels will never hit 100 mph on its own.

I​ do wish the taillights were nicer, but then again, this casting is much older than I am, so I shouldn't really complain. I love how nice this thing looks for its age. I actually thought it was a new casting until I looked at the base.

T​he white interior is period and movie correct, but it definitely shows the casting's age above everything else. Then again, it probably didn't have much from the factory to begin with.

Eagle eyed readers will most likely notice that it has a front plate only. Wonderful observation. It says 205 and has screws painted on. It also has amber lights on the bumper, which is a neat touch I wasn't expecting. The front does, however, look slightly bland without a painted Mustang badge.

The Tropical Turquoise paint looks absolutely stunning and very 60s on this car. I absolutely love it. With that being said, I'm rather indifferent for white interiors in any car.

According to the fender badge, this is a 289 Mustang, but it's not a Hi-Po due to the 3-speed "Cruise-o-matic" automatic as seen in the movie. The turbofan wheels do a good job at emulating the original knockoff wheel covers on the original. We'll never know the fate of the Mustang after they arrived at the hotel in the movie, but what we do know is that Fiona Volpe needs to sit this one out. She's just dead.

T​he second Mustang is the 1971 Mach 1 from the 1971 movie Diamonds are Forever. It's a Bright Red on Vermillion Mach 1 with the renowned 429 Cobra Jet engine. In the movie, it was rented by Tiffany Case to drive around with Bond. It was famously chased around Las Vegas at night and ended up getting up on two wheels. Well, two at a time, at least.

Although this casting isn't anywhere near as old as the '65 Mustang, it's still almost a decade old. I actually own the Boss 351 version of this casting in a box somewhere deep in my garage. As with the '65, this Mach 1 looks sublime for $1.

I​ particularly love how they managed to add tampos to the back of the car. The turbofans also add a period correct look, although I will note that they're doing their best to emulate the knock off wheel covers on the original.

L​ean over!

L​ean over!

L​ike the '65, this one is also missing headlight tampos, but I'll admit that the grille looks better than the one on the convertible.

I​n case you confused it with the Mach 1 Tempo or Aerostar.

I​t really does look like they shrunk the real one, but I will admit that I might be asking a bit too much for $1. Maybe I should address my complaints to Willard Whyte.

A​s for the cars, I do love them. They're proof that you can have just as much fun with $1 as you can with $50 Minichamps or $200 AutoArts. Sure, they're not as detailed, but they have their own little charm with their ties to the movies and the entertainment that comes from watching them just to see the real version of your little Hot Wheels. I'd recommend both to anyone who likes Bond movies or Mustangs in general. Hopefully they get around to making the Goldfinger Mustang down the line. We need the double blowout in our lives.

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