- VW Scirocco. A classic already?

We as human beings are by nature safe, secure and careful with almost anything important. Money perhaps being the most important thing of all (except perhaps your next breath). Almost everyone love to dream about making easy money, buying low and selling high. But a very little portion of us do that since it's highly risky and therefore could end in lots and lots of tears.

Future classic cars are a wonderful money making opportunity. In the last few years car enthusiasts and collectors have payed an enormous amount of money to acquire a low mileage 80's hot hatch or fast saloon. This is not a middle to upper class hobby. Collecting Minichamps models and rare playing cards is. This is a hobby for the elite. How can it be a hobby for everyone?

A Lamborghini Diablo and a Facel Vega Facel II behind it, expensive classics.

A Lamborghini Diablo and a Facel Vega Facel II behind it, expensive classics.

As I said before, it's risky and only a few are willing to take the risk. That is why it will remain a niche. But some who are interested and can sniff out the classics from the crowd may succeed. They require courage, skill and near magical abilities to see into the future. What do car fanatics with significantly deep pockets want? Which car has stood the test of time and is remembered fondly by the car culture?

I will for the next few days try to predict future classics that anyone with a stable job and some extra cash could by.

There are many answers to these questions. But to find an answer that no one has thought of is hard.

Predicting that the Aston Martin DB5, Ferrari Daytona and Porsche 911 Carrera RS would be future classics was no magic trick, the skill lies elsewhere. The skill is to find a fanatic niche market. Whoever thought ten years ago that a low mileage two door Range Rover would be future classic was a genius. Or that someone would pay over one hundred thousand euros, dollars, pounds or what ever for a Ford Sierra Cosworth. That is magic. And also insane.... -ly cool.

To think that you could sense which car would shoot up in price next and then capitalize on it. The thought is completely intoxicating.

How to do it? At first I have to point out that I haven't capitalized on predicting a future classic. Maybe because I've always been wrong or maybe because I haven't got the fortitude or the money. It's the latter. But remember Top Gear in 2003? Richard Hammond did a segment on future classics featuring a VW Corrado VR6 and a Mercedes 190E *more numbers* Cosworth. The topic of future classics was not as hot then as it is now. But in spite of this, the good ol' Hamster had some excellent advice which are applicable in future car shopping even today.

The two first points Richard "the Hamster" Hammond makes is that the car should be young enough to be reliable and good to drive but old enough that it's been lost in the pages of history. The latter point is very good but if you purchase a car for the sole purpose of selling it in the coming years, with profit in mind, then the last thing you want is to drive it. At least not much. Bare in mind many unreliable cars have shot up in value, such as some Alfa Romeos.

The formerly clean shaven now goatee wearing Hammond then goes on saying that it needs to be rare. Yep. It does. It doesn't matter how it became rare. Limited production, sales flop, too expensive as new or that the car became rare by natural causes i.e. rust. It has to be rare, period.

With the inadvertent help from the brave little rodent I will for the next few days try to predict future classics that anyone with a stable job and some extra cash could by. I'm trying to avoid predicting something that has already been sold at ludicrous prices like the BMW M1.

A classic for sure

A classic for sure

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