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Has Porsche cracked the code to produce the EV for the 'helmsman driver'?

Is this the perfect formula for a car enthusiast's dream EV?

5w ago
14.5K

This huge craze and fast-growing adoption of electric vehicles isn’t anything new. In fact, electric-powered vehicles are much older than we may think as they date all the way back to 1890 when Siemens had a go at making one. Since then, however, almost every single car maker under the sun has launched one, especially in the last five to ten years.

EVs are great for those who commute to work in the city or fancy a tech-fest, but what they aren’t so good at is creating a sense of fun. Fun which can be enjoyed by car enthusiasts all over the world. It seems that if you wanted to have fun in an electric vehicle, you either needed to be on a go-kart track or have a few million quid knocking about…until now.

Image - Porsche

Image - Porsche

You see, just a few years ago, Porsche launched the Taycan – a fully-electric Porsche which aimed to actually be fun. This model proved very popular amongst journalists and car enthusiasts, but it didn’t quite do it. The power was put down by all four wheels, making it very difficult to slide around and made it rather boring, much like in the same way a cat runs. The only way to get them to slide around a bit is by making the surface slippery as they are, in theory, AWD. So, as a way to tackle this, Porsche has come out with a new variant of the Taycan and this time it is back to basics with a lighter ‘baby Taycan’ sporting RWD.

This hearing-aid-coloured Porsche (pictured) looks much like the standard Taycan and that’s because as far as looks go, it is identical to any other in the range, bar the Cross Turismo. However, it differs by not having an electric motor at the front which makes it significantly lighter than its older and more expensive relatives. Speaking of which, the Taycan RWD is now considered Porsche’s ‘entry-level’ electric car, meaning it starts at £70,000 which is almost £10,000 less than the next one up – the Taycan 4 Cross Turismo. This is quite a significant saving, but do you still get your money’s worth?

Image - Porsche

Image - Porsche

Well, actually, yes you do. All that you are missing out on is the motor at the front. The Taycan RWD still comes with all the bells and whistles of any Porsche model, which is everything you could ever want from a car. But just because it appears cheap, doesn’t mean it will be as Porsche is known for charging its customers a fortune for any optional extras. For example, I optioned one on its online configurator and it came out at just over £106,000, meaning there was around £35,000 worth of options slapped on. Admittedly, that may just be my preferred spec, but it’s still something to consider when entering the buying process. However, Porsche reckons the average Taycan buyer will add on an extra 10-15 per cent onto the base price.

Anyway, what is the Taycan RWD like to drive? Well, as you would expect with any other car out of the German manufacturer’s factory, it drives like a Porsche. Think of it as a fully-electric version of the 911 Carrera S, but one weighing over two tonnes. It is powered by a just one motor at the rear which is capable of producing 375hp with the standard 79kWh battery pack. If you are willing to upgrade to the 93kWh pack for an extra £4,800 then you unlock an extra 94 horsepower and a claimed range of 301 miles on one charge.

Despite it having one less motor than other Taycan models, the entry-level RWD still reaches 60mph in a brisk 5.4 seconds and then onto a top speed of 143mph. If you look at these stats and feel as though you would prefer more straight-line speed, then the 4S or Turbo S may be the one for you. But, if you are interested in some fun around corners then you will lap up the RWD in the same way a hungry skier slurps up a steaming hot Goulash soup in St. Moritz, a place where most Taycan owners are encouraged to go with Porsche’s optional extra roof box and snow chains.

So to conclude, should you buy the Taycan RWD over the other model variants and other electric vehicles available on the market today? To be honest, it boils down to what exactly you are after. If you want straight line speed, a great charging infrastructure, and a good price then you should probably look towards Tesla. But, if you are a car enthusiast and want a well-built car which makes a great daily, has plenty of range and is fun at the weekend, then the Taycan RWD is for you, just as long as you don’t mind paying a hefty premium over a lesser-EV.

Is the Porsche Taycan RWD your favourite EV?

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Comments (13)

  • The RWD does nothing to make the Taycan more fun to drive. The most fun ones are the dual motors with torque vectoring!

      1 month ago
    • But does the dual motor variant increase Helmansry?

        1 month ago
  • Yes and no but mostly no. Has no gears therefore it ain't a real drivers car. It's an ev yet it says turbo. Still no real driver engagement. But tbh it is solid tho, and heavy

      1 month ago
    • Having driven one, it’s easily the closest to an enthusiast EV. But realistically, it’s the daily driver parked next to the 7MT 911 Carrera S in your garage.

        1 month ago
    • And the Plymouth Roadrunner isn’t a bird what’s your point

        1 month ago
  • The one I'd have based on the reviews, but that said I haven't driven one so I couldn't say honestly. Personally I'd have a Panamera with that wonderful V8 though.

      1 month ago
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