Here are 5 more of the best-sounding race cars ever

These racing machines also make some amazing noises!

6w ago
12.1K

Last time, I showed you my opinion on the 7 best-sounding race cars of all time. I have taken 5 suggestions from other people in the comments of that post and made a Part Two. Hope you enjoy this one just as much as the last!

Credit: Ultimatecarpage.com

Credit: Ultimatecarpage.com

BMW M3 GTR - Vishnu Anil

Ah, the fabled M3 GTR. A video game icon and a dominant race car, with its smooth and resounding V8 engine. This car was also equipped with a sequential transmission; the straight-cut gears making a captivating whine on top of its sonorous powerplant. In the 2000 American Le Mans Series, it finished third in the GT class, but BMW wanted a more competitive car than the 6-cylinder M3 that PTG was using. So, for 2001, they developed an entirely new engine.

Their race-ready, naturally-aspirated V8 pumped out an astonishing 443 horsepower, almost 100 more than its closest rival, the Porsche 996 GT3. After BMW Motorsport took first place overall in the ALMS GT category, the rules were altered. Instead of making 100 cars and 1000 expensive engines for the road, BMW decided to withdraw. In 2003, '04 and '05, the M3 GTR raced at the Nürburgring 24H, winning the latter two years to show that this dominant car was still brilliant.

Credit: Ultimatecarpage.com

Credit: Ultimatecarpage.com

Ferrari 412 T2 - Tom Charlton

I can't believe that not a single F1 car was included in the last article! Oops! Anyways, In 1995, F1 made a few big changes after the 1994 season as a result of Ayrton Senna's tragic death. The capacity of the engines was reduced to 3 litres and crash protection was improved, along with a few aerodynamic changes here and there. Although it struggled to keep up with the V10 cars of Williams and Benetton, it still produced another 3rd place Championship result for Ferrari.

This was also, sadly, the end of an era. This Ferrari's screaming V12 engine, flying all the way to 17,000RPM and producing 700 horsepower, was the last of its kind in Formula One. After 1995's season, nobody on the grid was using a 12-cylinder powerplant. Before Michael Schumacher moved to Ferrari in 1996, he tested the 412 T2 and declared that it was 'good enough to win a World Championship'. Coming from him, that comment was certainly something special.

Credit: Motor1.com

Credit: Motor1.com

Lexus LFA - Tommy Vercetti

Until last week, I had no idea that the legendary Lexus LFA was involved in motorsport. But, upon doing some research, I came to the realisation that Tommy Vercetti was right. Before entering production in 2011, this car competed as a racing prototype. Back in 2008, it began racing around the Nürburgring with some fairly good results. Gazoo Racing entered an LFA alongside the IS F in two races of the 2009 VLN series, with the V10 monster winning both.

Next up was the 24-hour race, where it showed great potential, with its lap times and average speeds closing in on those of the next class up, SP9. One of the two cars entered managed to finish 4th in its class behind an IS F. It was a class winner in 2010, and was subsequently put into production the following year. Toyota's 4.8-litre V10, reaching 9,000RPM, is the heart and soul of the Lexus LFA, and its euphoric soundtrack will remain legendary for many years to come.

Credit: Supercars.net

Credit: Supercars.net

McLaren F1 GTR - Tom Martin

Somehow, I forgot to include this car in my previous article. I saved a video of it to use, but despite that, it slipped my mind and I feel ashamed for not including it. This is the only racing evolution of one of the greatest road cars of all time: the McLaren F1. Initially, Gordon Murray didn't want to take the F1 racing, as he saw it only as 'the ultimate road car', but many people saw its potential. Murray was eventually convinced, and he reluctantly agreed to modify it.

From 1995, and continuing on until 2005, the ultimate road car had become a brilliant race car, with an overall victory at the 1995 Le Mans 24H among many other successes. Although the McLaren F1's BMW V12 intake had to be restricted, reducing output to to about 600hp, it still generated a spectacular sound, whilst being more nimble than the road car due to less weight and more downforce. This resounding race car was the next evolution of this driving machine.

Credit: Wikipedia

Credit: Wikipedia

Mercedes-Benz C11 - Asker Clarkfeldt

The rumbling, low-revving heart of this Sauber Mercedes racer was none other than a twin-turbo, 5-litre V8, where its tumultuous 730 horsepower to the rear wheels and 905-kilogram weight helped it to victory. But it wasn't just this. The engine managed to strike the perfect balance between power and economy, as well as having more downforce than its fierce competitor, the Jaguar XJR-11. The team dominated the WSC in 1990, winning all but one race.

The team also had quite a few excellent drivers throughout the World Sportscar Championship series, including a young Michael Schumacher at the last race in Mexico. At the C11's debut in Japan, the 3-year-old Sauber C9 had to step in due to a crash in practice, but the C9 still won. The new car's first race start was in Italy, winning 7 out of 9 races that year. This car not only won lots of races, but it also won the hearts of everyone who heard it thunder along the track.

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