Holden Hurricane: the Greatest Wedge there Ever Was

26w ago

12.2K

This is one of those paradox models in the debate between diecast and resin. It’s a car that should have been made out of diecast with opening parts. It’s a car that would have never been made if it weren’t for the simplicity of resin model manufacturing.

Coincidentally, the Holden Hurricane actually began its life as a scale model. It was developed into a full-size concept car in an attempt to ditch Holden's then "family car" image. Wedge shapes and V8's were all the rage in the late 60's, and this car fit the bill. A dramatic canopy lifted the entire windshield and side panels up and away from the car, allowing the driver and passenger to drop in. The car didn't have any rear side-view mirrors either; the car pioneered a system that used cameras and a dash-mounted monitor.

It was paraded around Holden dealerships for a while, but it ultimately wound up in storage. It was supposed to be destroyed on more than one occasion, and was also restored twice while hidden from the public. Finally, in the mid-2000's, it was given the proper restoration project it deserved. No one really knows who designed the Hurricane, and no one really knows it was ever driven before it was locked away in storage for years. Motor Trend did an amazing piece on this history of this car back in 2013. You can find that article on their website here.

This model is a 1:18 scale version of the car from an Australian model distributor: Apex Replicas. In addition to distributing several popular brands, they began commissioning their own model builds of legendary Australian cars. Unfortunately they decided to use resin instead of diecast, and since the model is made of resin, that fighter jet canopy does not open. We really miss out on one of the car’s defining features. The rear engine hatch also opened like a clamshell backwards but we do not get to see that Holden 4.2L V8 lurking in the back.

The little known manufacturer from Down Under set an MSRP of a staggering $250, but American diecast retailer Replicarz get ahold of a handful of these models and marked them down to $99. That, in my opinion, is more in line with this model’s quality. The wheels are paired on solid axles, which bounce around much like that of a Hot Wheels car. The paint color is more bronze that the orange metal-flake I think it should be, but I edited the warmth in my photos to get the color I wanted. I’ve also got a weird, oily rainbow mark on the inside of the windshield. I really don't think I should have to crack open a $250 model to clean the insides myself.

Nevertheless, this is the only 1:18 scale model of one of my favorite concept cars ever. Of course I needed one in my collection, but I was definitely glad I was patient until a deal popped up.

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