- Image by Nathan Trampe

I have written once about a pleasant exchange I had with the lucky owner of a Ferrari Challenge Stradale, in where he undermined my notion that having a supercar is somehow tiring from all the rubberneckers and commoners wanting to touch it. It was an enjoyable conversation, although it still didn't shake that notion completely from my skull.

Because I just don't know if I would be a man of similar character to him. Personally, I find it tiring sometimes to make pleasant idle conversation in the office with people with whom I work, let alone chatting to someone whose kid is smearing their grubby hands over my pride-and-joy.

But I still aspire to ownership of a supercar - and on the site, I feel that this isn't a unique goal.

To enter the upper echelons of performance and drive, and to do so quietly, has really only offered a few candidates to consider; BMW M stuff, Mercedes AMG, or Audi RS to name but a few. But to resign to only these specialist vehicle makes would be to avoid ever knowing and learning what it is like to pilot a mid-engined (or rear-engined) vehicle.

Feeling that weight transfer happening behind the shoulders would be such an alien sensation, but one that reminds you of precisely what you hold in your grip.

Then I watched a video by Regular Car Reviews.

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In this particular video, Mr Regular mentions about how the Audi R8, the brand's iconic foray into the realm of supercars, garners almost zero attention - or at least no more headturns than anything as "exotic" as an Audi TT.

Over time, the R8 has become a little more angular in its styling - although arguably still tepid when compared to standards set by Ferrari or Lamborghini - yet there is still a restrained brush that is drawing its shape. I do still lament the departure of the signature side-blades that the original R8 wore, and I implore Audi to bring them back.

Photo by Axel Eres on Unsplash - side blades. Look at them!!!!

Photo by Axel Eres on Unsplash - side blades. Look at them!!!!

It could be argued that to buy a supercar without the intention of standing out would be to miss the point entirely of owning one. It is an argument to which I cannot find a decent counter. To see a supercar is to notice a rarity. It is a bright moment on the road, when all other daily travel is on dull and grey tarmac.

Why would you, if you have the means, deny other enthusiasts the joy of seeing the unicorn you own? Surely, if you can't handle the banter and culture, then shouldn't you simply give the car to someone who's more cultured?

To see a supercar is to notice a rarity. It is a bright moment on the road, when all other daily travel is on dull and grey tarmac.

But I guess I am selfish in a way. I want that cake and to eat it, too. I want the supercar experience but without the added atmosphere and responsibility that comes with such a vehicle. Because you don't just own a supercar. You are driving something that others want to know more about, and know things that cannot just be read in magazines.

People want to learn beyond the articles. If I saw a Bugatti Veyron, then I would want to see first-hand what a $30,000 indicator stalk looks like.

The headline of this opinion piece is probably defunct at this point. The question probably isn't whether a supercar can "fly under the radar", but perhaps more "*Should* a supercar fly under the radar?"

And I fear I know the answer.

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