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Jim Clark

Born in Scotland, James “Jim” Clark Jr., early showed his aptitude to drive, and there is even a story that, at the age of eight, he was driving his father's car at the family farm, prompting his neighbours to believe that there wasn´t anybody in the car because they could not see him.

The way he managed to fulfil his dream of competing would be an argument for a movie, given that he did not escape from the classical family opposition or from the popular irony that emerged in the neighbourhood.

Maybe a description of Clark's racing talent stays far from reality, but it would be a great injustice not to try. And that description is made necessarily through the testimonies of those who competed with him, like Sir Jackie Stewart, who considers Clark the best driver he competed with and the best he has ever seen, expressing his admiration for the smooth, precise and clean way with which he raced, being simultaneously faster than competitors, but preserving himself and the machine, reason that gave him a greater probability of finalizing the races in a fragile car as was the Lotus.

The records that have remained for the history of F1 are not, in absolute terms, those of greater prominence, but they are truly impressive at the time in which Clark ran. In 1968, at the age of 32 he was already the driver who had the record of victories (25) and pole positions (33) in F1, and he had achieved it, in only 72 races disputed between 1960 and 1968, all by Team Lotus, from which he became 2 times world champion. Clark was also the first and only, to date, to win the F1 world championship and the Indianapolis 500 in the same year (1965).

Despite his success in F1, farming was his bigger interest, to which he wanted to dedicate after finishing his motor racing career. Something less challenging, one might think, but Jim Clark did not feel gratified by success or influenced by it, continuing to have the same reserved personality that feels better far distant from the limelight. Ironically, it was through a participation in a secondary event disputed in Hockenheim (F2), which would be unthinkable today, that Jim Clark suffered a fatal accident.

And so, the desired departure for a discreet life on a sheep farm became a myth called Jim Clark and his name would be invoked forever in F1 history.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5FpD-r4osk (Jackie Stewart talks about Jim Clark)

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