NEW: Porsche unwraps limited-edition birthday Boxster

Celebrating the 25th anniversary of our mid-engine roadster with the ‘Boxster 25 Years’.

5d ago
16.6K

The Boxster has a very special meaning for Porsche. After all, it’s the car that helped navigate the choppy economic waters of the mid-1990s. It was also the first Porsche to be fitted with a water-cooled flat-six engine and intelligent carry-over parts that were later incorporated into the 996 generation 911.

The Boxster first appeared as a concept at the Detroit Motor Show in January 1993. With echoes of the legendary 550 Spyder and 718 RS 60 Spyder racing car, and the promise of an affordable price point, it captured the imagination of a new international audience for Porsche.

When the production car was launched in August 1996, it featured a mid-mounted 2.5-litre flat-six making 159 kW (204 PS). By 1999 this had grown to 2.7-litres and 162 kW (220 PS), while the newly launched Boxster S used a 3.2-litre Boxer with 191 kW (260 PS).

The 987 generation followed in 2004 with numerous enhancements in design and technology, including the option of PASM and PCCB (Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake) ceramic brakes and the Sport Chrono package. By the end of its production run, power was up once again and PDK had replaced the Tiptronic transmission.

In 2012, Porsche presented the comprehensively restyled 981, with a lightweight body and revamped chassis. By 2014, the first Boxster GTS had arrived with 243 kW (330 PS), followed soon by the 3.8-litre engine Boxster Spyder, whose 276 kW (375 PS) output made it the most powerful road-going derivative to date.

The Porsche 718 Boxster set another new course in January 2016, making its debut with four-cylinder turbo engines and new design language. The 2.0 and the 2.5-litre boxer engines were joined in 2019 by the new Boxster Spyder and Cayman GT4, sharing the 309 kW (420 PS) 4.0-litre engine that would also be offered in the latest 718 Boxster GTS 4.0.

This latest anniversary model, which is limited to 1,250 units, is based on that GTS 4.0 model. It references numerous design features of the Boxster concept from 1993 but features ‘Neodyme’, a copper-like shimmering brown that creates a contrast to the simple GT Silver Metallic of the original Detroit show car. In every anniversary car this appears on the front apron, side air intakes, lettering and on the two-tone 20-inch alloy wheels.

Other striking design details includes the fuel filler cap, which is enhanced by Porsche script from the Exclusive Design range. Meanwhile, the tailpipes of the sports exhaust system are finished in high-gloss, while the windscreen surround is finished in contrasting black.

In keeping with the style of the historic original, the new car combines a Bordeaux leather interior with a red or black fabric hood bearing embossed ‘Boxster 25’ lettering. An interior package in Aluminium, 14-way electrically adjustable sports seats, door sill trims with further ‘Boxster 25’ lettering and a heated GT multifunction sports leather steering wheel are just some of the features included as standard. Under the skin, other no-cost extras include Porsche Active Suspension Management sports suspension (PASM), which is 10 millimetres lower, and Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) with mechanical limited-slip differential.

To compliment the effortless power delivery of the high-revving 294 kW (400 PS: Boxster 25 (manual transmission): combined fuel consumption 10.8 l/100 km; combined CO2 emissions 246 g/km / Boxster 25 (PDK): combined fuel consumption 9.6 l/100 km; combined CO2 emissions 219 g/km) naturally aspirated engine, Porsche is offering the Boxster 25 Years with a manual six-speed transmission and a seven-speed PDK. The car will reach a top speed of 293 km/h with either, and in combination with PDK and the standard Sport Chrono package, sprints from zero to 100 km/h in just four seconds.

Porsche is offering the Boxster 25 Years in GT Silver Metallic, although Deep Black Metallic and Carrara White Metallic are also available. The car is available to order now and arrives in dealerships from the end of March 2021.

Boxster 25 (manual transmission): Combined fuel consumption 10.8 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 246 g/km

Boxster 25 (PDK): Combined fuel consumption 9.6 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 219 g/km

718 Boxster GTS 4.0: Combined fuel consumption 10.8 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 246 g/km

718 Boxster GTS 4.0 (PDK): Combined fuel consumption 9.6 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 219 g/km

718 Spyder: Combined fuel consumption 10.9 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 249 g/km

718 Spyder (PDK): Combined fuel consumption 10.2 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 232 g/km

718 Cayman GT4: Combined fuel consumption 10.9 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 249 g/km

718 Cayman GT4 (PDK): Combined fuel consumption 10.2 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 232 g/km

Boxster 25 (PDK): Combined fuel consumption 9.6 l/100 km; Combined CO2 emissions 219 g/km

Join In

Comments (5)

  • As a Boxster owner, this pretty cool and tempting.

      4 days ago
  • I owned a 986 and loved the balance, drive and looks but not the maintenance bills...seemed like there was always something broken on it.

      3 days ago
  • I owned a 2001 boxster and it was a go cart. Bought it with 21k miles on the odometer and the engine blew at 44k miles. Dealer told me “i drove it to hard” to which I responded “if i wanted to drive like a granny I’d buy a Camry”. Anyway, fun car. I currently own a 99 carerra with a manual trans . Last of the somewhat analog Porsches.

      4 days ago
  • It's great, but the c8 vette is very tempting

      4 days ago
5