- Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Nissan tech breakthrough means your daily will be more supercar than ever before

Could your future Ford Focus take a Lamborghini at the lights?

3w ago

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In today's world, the direct correlation seen between a cars performance capabilities and the weight it carries is more important, and noticeable, than ever before. It's all fair and well slotting a big fat engine that produces a trillion horsepower under the bonnet, but is that what defines performance these days? I wouldn't say so.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

This is why lightweight, Sci-Fi-esque materials like carbon fibre are becoming a staple in sports cars, super cars and hyper cars alike in the 21st century. Along with presenting an incredible building block upon which to create a super fast car, lining a cars internal shell with carbon fibre also makes it remarkably strong, thus, offering a superb layer of protection for its occupants in the event of an accident. On top of all of that, it also helps to improve fuel efficiency dramatically - it really is a win-win element.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

The only drawback, and one which has limited the usage of carbon fibre in mainstream, mass-produced cars, is the price. According to HowStuffWorks, building a full skeletal frame for a car with carbon fibre costs, at the very least, $100,000 - that's even before other aspects of the car become involved. Whilst measures are being taken to try and reduce the costs of using it, the task is proving a difficult one.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

However, this may all be about to change. It seems that the process of how carbon fibre will be moulded into cars of the future has been evolved by an unlikely source. What's more, they claim that they've found a way to incorporate the fabled material into cars that are used on a day-to-day basis - that company is Nissan.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

The technique they've conjured up, called 'compression resin transfer bolding', involves sculpting the raw carbon fibre into the required shape before covering it in a die, which has a small gap located at the top. This is the most crucial part of the process, because this gap acts as a gateway between the upper part of the die and the carbon fibre, and through this gap, resin is then injected in and left to harden around the carbon.

Nissan also claim to have come up with a new process of simulating the permeability of the resin that's been placed along the raw carbon fibre, whilst also being able to see the way the resin flows onto the carbon by using an in-die temperature gauge, coupled with a pellucid die. This also means that the total production time for the carbon fibre panels will be shortened tenfold.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

The company are still keeping their intentions for how and when they'll use the technique under wraps, but we can speculate that they'll use forthcoming sports cars, such as the 400Z, as a means of testing their breakthrough. If this ends up working, which it likely will because the Japanese are impeccable at everything they do, most manufacturers will ultimately adopt the same technique in their factories. This may just be a pivotal turning point in the future of mass-produced cars.

What do you think about Nissan's newest development? Leave your thoughts below!

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

Image credit: Nissan Motor Corporation Global.

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Comments (21)

  • "If this ends up working, which it likely will because the Japanese are impeccable at everything they do, most manufacturers will ultimately adopt the same technique in their factories." LOL!

      24 days ago
  • This sounds like a variation of RTM, which has been around decades.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transfer_molding

      23 days ago
    • Agree, this appears to be tweaks around the edges of RTM or compression molding, and won't move the ball forward all that much. Can't get around the material price difference of at least 10x for carbon vs steel

        23 days ago
    • Stamping steel, or aluminium, is very cheap and quick as well. It is why additive printing is never going to be a major player for mass production.

        23 days ago
  • Is it just me, or is this basically the old way of injecting on a form in a vacuum bag while in the autoclav without the form as we know it?

      22 days ago
  • I doubt this could come soon but I really hope they succeed in the future.

      20 days ago
  • So will the new 400Z do 200mph?

      24 days ago
    • OH Come oN NiSsAn LaUnCh ThE 40oz SOON¡!!!!!!¡!!!!¡!

        24 days ago
    • Realistically: No

      Theoretically: the Nissan GTR lineage went from a 150mph car to a 200mph car, therefore I think the Nissan Z project is overdue a revamp

        23 days ago
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