- Hero image: "Photo by James Lee on Unsplash". Art, text and errors by: Chris Breeden

For us GM lovers, the finale of The Grand Tour left us scratching our heads a little. How is it possible that an entire country could be in love with FoMoCo, so much? Ford is a car company, that in the US, has been guilty of producing some pretty poorly constructed and thought out cars and trucks.

Need I remind everyone that this is the company that brought us the overweight and overly complex Small Block Ford engine. They then doubled down on faulty logic and produced the even heavier and even more insanely constructed Big Block Ford. They are also known for creating Mustangs that would rust out in less than 4 years, (the cowl vents in all 1960s Mustangs), trucks that would rust out in half that time, (F100s and F150s of the ‘60, ‘70s and ‘80s), and had electrical systems that were so overly complex and made of such poor quality materials, only a British Leyland technician would think they were a good idea.

Photo by Sam Warren on Unsplash

Photo by Sam Warren on Unsplash

In the US, Ford Motor company produced very questionably engineered and constructed cars from 1945 to the early 2000’s, but in other countries they are considered to be a great manufacture. How is this possible? Is it because Ford was constructing things differently overseas during the last half of the 20th century and those blue ovals were better than the models offered here in the US? Or could it be Ford was actually doing the same thing outside the US that it was doing here and that the cars that were being produced in other countries, by “native” manufactures, were of such horrible quality the Fords were actually just better?

How is it possible that Ford is able to score so high on those, near daily, “Pick your favorite US manufacture” polls we see on DT? Part of it probably has to do with the age of the average user on DT being below 30, if you believe those every other day, “How old are you?” polls. Users aren't taking into account FoMoCo's half a century of poor quality product and they have little experience with GM's better quality during that same time period.

But... (you had to see that coming, right?)

What I’m about to say is going to shock a lot of you. Those young people shouldn’t take Fords 20th Century failures and GM’s successes into account when answering those "Who do you like" polls. I believe they should judge manufactures by what they are doing now. Comparably speaking, you'll find that Ford is redeeming itself by producing cars that are of the same, if not better, quality than their pre WW2 cars.

Photo by Ali Moharami on Unsplash

Photo by Ali Moharami on Unsplash

GM has fallen far behind its arch nemesis, Ford. To see this, just look at the mechanically superior, but ugly, Camaro and the missed opportunity that is the new Blazer. In fact, the only two things GM is doing correctly are the LS engine and the C8 Corvette. The LS engine was designed at the end of the 20th Century. Making it an example of GM milking the Small Block engine design to the last drop. The C8 is a different story. Hopefully, it shows that GM might understand that they’ve been wrong. Maybe the C8 can lead GM to a better path.

(See how I've taken a negative article about Ford and then turned it into a criticism of GM? That means I’ve now managed to anger the two largest automotive communities in the US with one story! I’ve totally skipped over Chrysler, but they really should be use to that by now. Now I’ve really done it!)

Please direct all flame to the comments section.

About the Author:

"Chris Breeden is a Social Media content creator for Custom & Hot Rod Life on DRIVETRIBE, YouTube and Facebook. After spending 5 years in Southern California, a.k.a. Hot Rod Heaven, while serving as a jet engine mechanic in the United States Marine Corps, he moved back home to Tennessee with an even greater love for Hot Rodded Vintage Tin. Since then he has worked in retail sales and the transportation and logistics industry. In 2018, seeing a gap in Hot Rod and Custom Car coverage on DRIVETRIBE, Chris began advocating for their inclusion on the platform. During the summer months, he can be found all over the Tennessee region covering car shows, meets, and cruise-ins. During the winter months, he can be found in the garage working on his custom 1949 Ford two-door sedan and 1954 F100 truck."

New Love food? Try foodtribe.

Join in

Loading...
Comments (17)
    Loading...
    Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
17
Loading...