- Starting point of this project.

Primeval Wedge, Part 1 of 2 (or so): Lesney Lamborghini Marzal Rebuild

Lamborghini's third concept car, and one of the most influential of all concept exotic cars.

While at a friend's 2nd hand shop in Junction City, Oregon, I was looking at the diecast he had on offer... most of it wasn't my thing, but this well loved Lamborghini Marzal caught my eye, having recently seen a well-done custom of the same casting and having decided to build authentic customs of so many of the 60s/70s show cars that Lesney made back in that era as I acquire them. My plan was to build this up into an accurate stock replica of the original concept, and I got home, drilled it open, and did a bunch of research. The below gallery describes the casting as I found it.

The 1/1 concept, photographed along the coast of Italy.

The 1/1 concept, photographed along the coast of Italy.

The real Marzal was a very influential concept car, based on a stretched Miura chassis with the engine moved back and a standard Miura windshield pane, and it introduced transverse V6s, plastic bumpers, massive glass area, skylight roofs and the "wedge" school of auto design to the world, forecasted most of the 70s' and 80s' automotive styling trends, and also started Lamborghini on their trademark of gimmicky door hinging.

Back to the 1/64 Lesney custom that's the subject of this article; I found a set of Greenlight Shelby center lock mag wheels in my parts bin, reversed the Uniroyal white letter tires, and painted the centers to look as much like the 1/1 Marzal's one-of-a-kind Campagnolo alloys. Then I set to work on the base as well.

As far as the base goes, I lightly sanded the tarnished finish, painted the lights and bumpers, lowered the stance, detailed the rear license plate, and set the wheels into place.

The body was stripped in Aircraft Paint Stripper, washed/dried, and resprayed in Humbrol "aluminum" acrylic model paint, which works well for wintertime paint jobs in my climate (not a lot of paints work well here in Oregon this time of year), and is a very nice match for the various shades of silver that European and Asian automakers used back in the day.

The only feature of the real Marzal I will not be able to replicate is the clear roof panel, but I will be painting that in dark grey panel line wash applied with a wide camel's hair brush, to approximate the look of a tinted glass panel, so as to go well with what I did with the glass.

Otherwise, there really isn't a lot of trim to paint on a proper replica Marzal... just the Bertone and Lamborghini badging, the chromed console with black accents, black & silver steering wheel, & black dash inside, the black rub strips down the sides, and black wash on the vents, panel lines and rear grille panel.

And the interior, with that gaudy silver vinyl-coated leather that was so prized by 60s/70s/80s concept car designers in the US, Europe & Japan. The dash and steering wheel will be painted, as will the console, and I will also install a shift lever.

And the interior, with that gaudy silver vinyl-coated leather that was so prized by 60s/70s/80s concept car designers in the US, Europe & Japan. The dash and steering wheel will be painted, as will the console, and I will also install a shift lever.

Stay tuned for part 2!

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Comments (2)

  • SWEET write up and article, can't wait to see it complete!!!! I saw a proto body in white of this car they have at the Lambo family museum in Italy. Please can you expand on what's up with painting in Oregon this time of year? I have a few guesses about what you mean but would rather you just explain.

      1 month ago
  • I really enjoy seeing your process and reading the details of how you go about your creations. Great stuff.

      1 month ago
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