- Laying out all the parts.

I will start off by saying that I am a die hard DIY type of person. Can not really claim it is for cost, or quality reasons. I have often ended up spending more money, or done a worse job then if I had just paid someone that knew what they were doing. To me I just really enjoy learning, messing around and working with my hands.

My Bimota SB6R has been sitting on display for many years. It has only been ridden about 2500 miles since it was originally built. Late in the summer I bleed the brakes and flushed the old fluid as best I could. The goal was to make the brakes work enough to safely move it under power, knowing full well that over the winter I would tear everything apart for a deep clean and service.

Crusty.

Crusty.

The years had not been kind to the brake fluid. It has all turned to this jell filled with what felt like sand. Not overly hard to clean out, just tedious. My plan was to figure out what size Brembo masters were used, and order the corresponding rebuild kits. At this point it would be easier to measure the parts and hope to cross reference to a Ducati or other bike from the area then to hope to get help from Bimota. Some get scared off of owning something rare and exotic like a vintage Bimota because they fear getting parts. The fact of the matter is that these types of bikes very often use off the shelf components from other manufactures. Bimota never had the funds to create a bespoke brake system, so the bought Brembo units. I assume these are the exact same units off of a 916 of the same era.

There was more goo behind the caliper pistons.

There was more goo behind the caliper pistons.

I completely stripped the two masters and three calipers. Everything seems to be in great shape and just in need of a cleaning. As you can see in the pictures the brake fluid had turned and needed to be cleaned out.

Low miles for sure.

Low miles for sure.

I am on the fence about changing the pads. They obviously have plenty of life left in them, but there are modern compounds on the market now that greatly improve brake performance. Maybe I should order a set of EBC HH pads. What do you guys think?

GREAT NEWS!

GREAT NEWS!

Any time that you are taking apart calipers, it is important to inspect the sides of the pistons. This surface is what seals the calipers. If sitting for a while they can get some moisture near the seals and pit the surface. This pitting renders the pistons to the garbage bin. Not the end of the world really, but why spend money if you do not have too? In this case the pistons are all perfect. No signs of damage or issues. They will offer many more years of service.

Soaking in PB Blaster

Soaking in PB Blaster

One of the front calipers did not want to come apart, so it was soaked in penetrating fluid and some light heat applied to convince the bolts to rotate.

Everything in a place, and a place for everything.

Everything in a place, and a place for everything.

So far, so good. Very much enjoying seeing the insides of all these Brembo parts. The components are very well made and it really makes you understand why these calipers were so highly regarded in period.

Will spend a couple of evenings after dinner in the work shop cleaning up all the castings and making sure everything is perfect. There will be some updated pictures of all the beautiful parts ready to go back on the bike.

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