Here in the scale model world, the never ending debate between the Renaissance of resin manufacturers and diecast manufacturers dying off is not the only source of division among the community. AutoArt, often regarded as the pinnacle of scale model replicas, has abandoned diecast metal and have spent the past few years that their composite material, or ABS, is superior. Their argument is that using ABS as their material of choice for body panels results in better shut lines and more resilient paint. Many collectors read between the lines and know that the switch comes down to one thing: AutoArt's bottom line.

I've heard several collectors declare that they are shifting their focus towards hunting these older AutoArt models down. I haven't noticed prices of these models jump on the secondhand market in correlation, so I will happily snatch up any that I come across. I had this GT2 on my wish list for a long time, and I finally snagged this one over the summer for a decent deal.

This Porsche is certainly starting to show its age. Afterall, this model was probably released when the 996 GT2 was still Porsche's halo car. The side markers are just printed on the metal body. The doors have dogleg hinges, which everyone loves to hate, and do not stay closed on their own anymore. In fact, all of the openings pop open if I give the car a good shake. (Do not shake your models.)

All things considered, this is an AutoArt model from the brand's heyday. Every inch of the car is fully detailed, and all body panels are made of metal. The doors open, the engine compartment opens, and the frunk open up. The interior and aforementioned frunk are trimmed with carpet. I never thought steerable wheels would be something we take for granted either.

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