- SKODA Safety

ŠKODA Safety- IBuzz Fatigue Alert

1y ago

6.1K

Technology is synonymous with automobiles. Today, technology has advanced so much that it's just question of 'when' rather than 'how' before driverless cars are regular sights on our roads.

At SKODA, we pride ourselves in incorporating the latest technological advances in our cars so that our customers can experience safer and smoother drives.

One feature we are particularly proud of is the iBuzz Fatigue Alert.

One of the biggest causes of accidents on roads across the world is driver fatigue. When people are driving long distances, they get tired and become less alert. People are also known to doze off behind the wheel, leading to catastrophic accidents.

SKODA Safety

What if there were a system built into cars that would alert the driver? A system that senses that the driver is not driving with complete alertness?

SKODA's iBuzz Alert is precisely such a system.

The iBuzz Alert advises the driver on the basis of information about the steering behaviour. The system recommends a break at speeds of 65 to 200 km/h.

After the ignition is switched on, the system examines the steering behaviour for 15 minutes. This analysis is constantly compared with the current steering behaviour. If the system detects any changes from the normal steering behaviour, it recommends a break from driving. The symbol appears in the instrument cluster display, with the message: DRIVER ALERT TAKE A BREAK and a warning signal is also sounded. The system recommends a break at speeds of 65-200 km/h.

The baseline analysis is deleted when one of the following happens:

1. The vehicle is stopped and the ignition is turned off.

2. The vehicle is stopped and the seat belt is taken off and the driver's door is opened.

3. If the vehicle is stopped for more than 15 minutes.

If none of these conditions are met, the system will recommend another break.

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Comments (1)
  • What if I'm driving on a normal winter road in northern scandinavia? Where its snowy, icy, narrow roads beaten up from chains on tractors and lorries, will the "erratic" driving pattern be recognized as a tired driver?

    11 months ago

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