SQUIRE 1½-LITER: THE BEST YOUTH

In 1935 one of the most interesting roadsters of the 1930s was born, designed by a young man with great ambitions

41w ago

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SQUIRE 1½-LITRE

Since he was a child, the British Adrian Squire had always been obsessed with cars and this had led him to work very young in both Bentley and MG where he showed a natural propensity for mechanical design.

Front section

Front section

He was so good and confident that at the age of 21, when he received a strong legacy in 1935, he made up his mind to build his own sports roadster that would take up the technology of the Formula Grand Prix.

Side section

Side section

Thus was born the Squire 1½-Liter, which was assembled until 1937 in seven copies.

Rear section

Rear section

The car was based on a sturdy steel chassis and the British branch of Vaden Plas was commissioned to build the bodywork.

An Anzani R1 1,5 8V four-cylinder engine was used as the engine, managed by a four-speed manual transmission and combined with rear-wheel drive.

Capable of delivering the power of 110 hp, the car was able to reach the maximum speed of 160 km/h with acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in 11 seconds.

Although the car had proved extremely fast and manageable thanks to the intuition of moving the center of gravity as low as possible, it was not successful as its cost was even greater than that of a much more noble Bugatti.

RANALAH 1½-LITRE

Adrian Squire was finally forced to close the company and go to work for Lagonda, but his project continued to live for some time as a couple of specimens were assembled by Valfried Zethrin, who reused the advanced spare parts commissioning the bodies to other different companies from Vaden Plas.

Front section

Front section

The first model was assembled by Ranalah Coachworks Ltd, which created a four-seater cabriolèt with the interior finished in fine red leather.

Rear section

Rear section

This specimen was Zathrin's personal car for a long time and he also used it to compete in some races with discreet results.

CORSICA 1½-LITRE

The second model had been commissioned by Geoffery Munro and the Corsica company was contacted for final assembly, which equipped the vehicle with a particularly aerodynamic body that included covers for the rear wheels.

Front section

Front section

It was later thought to reopen the company in the early 1940s, but the catastrophic advent of the Second World War did not allow this as Adrian Squire was killed during a bombing of the Luftwaffe.

Rear section

Rear section

Thus ended the story of the dream of a young enthusiast with great ambitions, who perhaps would have deserved more attention from his contemporaries.

Thank you to Valentina Zanola for the cooperation

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