The all-new 2022 Range Rover is here – and it's more luxurious than ever

Watch a full walkaround of the new, £94,000 Range Rover

5w ago
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Land Rover has just unveiled the all-new version of its range-topping, erm, Range Rover. This only happens once per decade, so this is big news – and Land Rover hasn't held back in its ambitions to push the flagship 4x4 even further upmarket.

Watch the video below for a quick walkaround and rundown of the new Range Rovers (plural for reasons that will become apparent), or read on for the full lowdown.

What's new then?

Well, everything. For a start, this all-new Range Rover comes in several forms. There's the regular model, a long-wheelbase version, a long-wheelbase version with seven seats (a first for a full-fat Range Rover), and high-end SV versions of all the above, which can be customised to your heart's content. The regular or 'core' short-wheelbase Range Rover will cost from £94,000. Which is a lot of money.

Evolutionary on the outside, but revolutionary inside

It's as though the Range Rover's been put through an Instagram smoothing filter

It's as though the Range Rover's been put through an Instagram smoothing filter

From the front the new Range Rover is, well, classic Range Rover. You're greeted by familiar but far more svelte headlight clusters, a grille that sits flush with the front bumper and will – on SV models sparkle with new brightwork. Lower down there's a wide chrome element below the numberplate which aims to give you the sense of extra width. The smooth theme continues down the side, with flush-mounted pop-out door handles, a new flat 'gill' behind the front wheels (again, with a laser-etched SV logo if you spend the extra cash).

The side profile is classic Range, with a swooping roofline, smoothed panels (with 50% smaller gaps than before) and a chunky set of windows

The side profile is classic Range, with a swooping roofline, smoothed panels (with 50% smaller gaps than before) and a chunky set of windows

Range Rover's not ditched the iconic waistline that extends from the side of the bonnet down to the bum of the car, so you still have a sense that the glasshouse is perched on top of the car.

It's around the back where the Range Rover is unmistakably brand-new – the rear end is bordered by a black strip running across the bootlid and down through the blacked-out vertical indicator/taillight clusters. The bodywork at the rear three-quarters of the car is pulled up, almost pinched to make the rear-end a bit pointier than before.

Naturally you still get a split tailgate, and there's optional event seating so you can sit comfortably under the shelter of the bootlid and watch the world go by, listening to tunes piped into the rear speakers, controlled by Range Rover's app. You even get spotlights to shine down on you while you relax. And yes, the boot is huge – 725 litres on regular models, and thousands more if you flip the rear seats down.

Fu Manchu's moustache makes an appearance on the new Range Rover's bottom. Split tailgate remains, obvs

Fu Manchu's moustache makes an appearance on the new Range Rover's bottom. Split tailgate remains, obvs

Enough of the looks – what about the oily bits?

There's a whole lot of new stuff under the skin. For a start the chassis is lighter and stiffer than ever, and the whole thing sits on the latest Bilstein dampers and air suspension. The new car is 12% more aerodynamic than before and Land Rover says 24% less noise is carried through the structure into the cabin.

The air suspension can apparently predict what's coming up around the corner and set itself up for maximum comfort and body control

The air suspension can apparently predict what's coming up around the corner and set itself up for maximum comfort and body control

Four-wheel steer is standard for the first time, as are 48-volt active anti-roll bars at both ends to add to comfort and stiffen things up in corners.

In terms of engines, there's a new 4.4-litre turbocharged V8 petrol engine (which may well be familiar to BMW owners…), complete with 530hp, 750Nm of torque and a 0-62mph time of 4.6 seconds. We're promised it sounds at least as good as the outgoing 5.0-litre supercharged unit, if not actually a bit better…

You'll still be able to do this…

You'll still be able to do this…

You'll also be able to pick a 510hp PHEV setup with a 400hp six-cylinder petrol engine with 110hp of electric help, capable of driving an impressive 50 real-world miles on a single charge of its 38kWh battery, and at speeds up to 87mph. It can take a 50kW charge so you can get from 0-80% in an hour. There's also a lower-power 410hp PHEV on the way.

If neither the V8 or PHEV setup tickles your pickle then you can plump for a mild-hybrid six-cylinder petrol or six-cylinder diesel.

Naturally, this Range Rover has been designed for the next decade, and so you'll be able to get a full electric one from 2024.

The interior is a slice of the future

A whole new range of materials from Vegan-friendly cloths to classic leather are available – and you can even get some ceramic knobs. Oo-er.

A whole new range of materials from Vegan-friendly cloths to classic leather are available – and you can even get some ceramic knobs. Oo-er.

Land Rover's thrown the kitchen sink at the interior of the new Range, but you wouldn't know it from first glance – the layout of the cabin is a lesson in gorgeous minimalism, complete with a new range of eco-friendly materials. We particularly love the optional wool-blend seats, and there's an Ultrafabric option which is 30% lighter than leather and uses 25% less CO2 to make.

Range Rover's also jumped on the wood bandwagon, so you can get some gorgeous open-pore veneers across the centre console and on the door cards. Higher-spec SV cars can be kitted out with thin veneers that are backlit, showing delicate patterns stamped into the wood. It's super cool.

Naturally the Range Rover's going to get the full range of off-road kit, including the 'invisible bonnet' camera mode

Naturally the Range Rover's going to get the full range of off-road kit, including the 'invisible bonnet' camera mode

The dashboard vents are designed to minimise clutter, although you do still get physical controls for air-con. Everything else goes through the massive 13.1-inch touchscreen, which runs Land Rover's excellent Pivi Pro system, as seen on the new Defender. You also get what sounds like a military-grade cabin air filtration system, which can even filter out Covid. Excellent.

The white surrounds are cold-to-the-touch ceramic – and you can see the subtly pattered wood, which can be backlit in certain areas

The white surrounds are cold-to-the-touch ceramic – and you can see the subtly pattered wood, which can be backlit in certain areas

Back seat passengers also get the luxury treatment. Even six-footers will find the seven-seater Range Rover's third-row seats are spacious enough – we've rarely managed to fit in the back of many cars' rearmost pews, but we were pretty well served, and you get leather trimmed armrests even in the very back.

This table rises majestically from the centre console, and can then be unfolded and rotated to serve either passenger

This table rises majestically from the centre console, and can then be unfolded and rotated to serve either passenger

Range Rover is, as usual, offering a two-seat rear option, complete with a new airline-style table that rises electrically from the centre console before swivelling to either side. Likewise, there are cupholders that raise up magically, and an optional champagne cooler that swooshes open.

Sounds like a lot of car…

Yup, and we've really only covered the top-level info here – it probably speaks volumes about the amount of 'newness' in the new Range Rover that it took seven huge press releases to divulge all the technical bits and pieces.

The big news is that it will cost from £94,400 in the UK (£10,000 more than before), presumably heading well into the mid £100,000s for long-wheelbase SV models with lots of customisation. So yup. It's fair to say Range Rover's set its sights firmly on the likes of the Bentley Bentayga – and we'll find out in early 2022 whether it's hit that target.

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Comments (52)

  • Who else thinks Tim looks like the sort of person who would try and sell you a dodgy Italian suit in a Surrey alleyway?

      1 month ago
    • Quite frankly he looks ridiculous. Those trousers with that jacket!!

      I wouldn’t buy anything off this man, I’d guess he was a rogue trader.

      Oh yeah, he’s a bald twat too. (Says the bald, fat twat)

        1 month ago
    • This time next year, he'll be a millionaire.

        1 month ago
  • It’s remarkable how JLR can make a product as good as this for the price. It may sound like a lot but when put up against its competitors, it’s a bargain!

      1 month ago
    • I think they're very good at reusing bits that don't really need updating.

      For many years Jaguar in particular have been master's of building high end cars with budget in mind 😎

      I immediately think of the second generation XK that still...

      Read more
        1 month ago
    • It should be 80k/90k

        1 month ago
  • Might be the replacement for my moms X7

      1 month ago
  • Always a fan of a nice rear end but that is a really nice rear end!!!

      1 month ago
    • 1 month ago
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