Earlier today, Aston Martin revealed the DBS Superleggera Concorde Edition, a new limited edition model by their bespoke "Q by Aston Martin" program designed to honor Concorde. For those who don't know, Concorde is the world's only successful supersonic transport liner which was in service from the late 1960s through to the early 2000s.

The DBS Superleggera Concorde Edition along with its namesake. (Image: Aston Martin)

The DBS Superleggera Concorde Edition along with its namesake. (Image: Aston Martin)

Built by BAC and Aerospatiale in a joint-venture between Britain and France, Concorde was able to fly above Mach 2 at 66,000 feet while shuttling approximately 100 passengers to and from their destinations. A flight on the jet from London to New York was clocked at around 3 hours, something a normal jetliner would take double the time to do. With that in mind, it's logical that the plane has gone down in history as one of the greatest achievements of the 20th century, and it's a sad shame they aren't still in the skies to this day.

British Airways Concorde G-BOAF.

British Airways Concorde G-BOAF.

So, a fast plane mated with a fast car makes sense, right? Honestly, I'm surprised it's taken this long for a Concorde-themed car to become a reality (the Chrysler Concorde does not count), and I would have thought Bugatti may have been the first to jump on the idea with a fleet of Concorde edition Chirons considering France's help in the development of the jet. But no, it was actually Aston Martin of all brands, but I'm fine with that. In fact, I couldn't be happier, and for very good reason.

Concorde in its own right has had a very special place in my heart since I was a child. I remember the day when I learned of its existence, which unfortunately, also was the day it was retired from service after its last flight. My parents bought me a book when I was about ten years old that was all about flight, and featured within this book was a two-page spread about Concorde. Every time a conversation about flights or planes came up with anyone around me, ever, I had to bring that majesty of the skies up. I was obsessed.

I finally came face to face with a Concorde last year, this one being Air France F-BVFA at the Steven Udvar-Hazy Center in Washington, D.C.

I finally came face to face with a Concorde last year, this one being Air France F-BVFA at the Steven Udvar-Hazy Center in Washington, D.C.

But by chance, I was also fairly obsessed with Aston Martin. Being a kid raised on his fair share of Bond flicks, I grew a great fondness for the manufacturer and its line of sleek grand tourers. In fact, I'd say the V12 Vanquish from the early 2000s was one of my earliest true dream cars, something that still stands to this day. The idea of the magnificence of Britain's best cars and planes were things that highly pleased me at the time, so much so that when I found my way to photoshop, I couldn't help but conjure up a dream of the perfect duo of earth and air together at last.

I uploaded this image to deviantArt sometime around 2010, titled "Britain: Masters of Road and Air." Poor quality due to the fact that the only way I could put it here is through a screenshot of a very small image.

I uploaded this image to deviantArt sometime around 2010, titled "Britain: Masters of Road and Air." Poor quality due to the fact that the only way I could put it here is through a screenshot of a very small image.

I imagined myself an extremely wealthy zillionaire with enough cash to buy my own Concorde and my own Aston Martin at the same time. I didn't know at the time that only one of those was really plausible, but it didn't stop me from daydreaming about the possibility. Since then, I grew up, but I still had love for the "Queen of the Skies," and while my interests turned to other brands, Aston Martin was still a solid favorite. But today, that love was immediately rekindled as soon as I saw the reveal on Instagram.

A top-down view of the DBS Concorde Edition showcases a few easter egg homages to the Concorde. (Image: Aston Martin)

A top-down view of the DBS Concorde Edition showcases a few easter egg homages to the Concorde. (Image: Aston Martin)

As I scrolled through the photos and looked at the fine details that made up the limited edition, I was in awe. Everything from the iconic Delta wing silhouette in the eternal Aston Martin side vents, the use of dark blue Connolly hide to match the interior of the later British Airways models, and even the feature of the plane's registry on the door sill plaques made me excited. With every new easter egg or homage I could find, I felt more and more joy at this creation. I felt like a kid again, and that Aston Martin had somehow probed my mind and brought my idea from long ago to reality.

However, I do know that's not exactly the case, and this is just a really great and logical homage for the brand to make. Unfortunately, reality came crashing back down as I realized that only ten cars would be made and only available through Aston Martin of Bristol. There's also the nagging fact that I definitely do not have Aston Martin money in the bank...unless I buy a very used DB7 or maybe scrap enough up for a Vantage. I suppose a lick of paint could help in that case, but I digress.

The door sill showcases the registry for Concorde G-BOAC. (Image: Aston Martin)

The door sill showcases the registry for Concorde G-BOAC. (Image: Aston Martin)

Regardless of reality's never-ending quest to crush my dreams, I'm so extremely pleased with this car's existence. It's such a perfect marriage of two things that deserve to go together, with the strong string of pure speed keeping them entwined. If you are interested, the limited run model is available now through Aston Martin UK, but act quickly, because I don't see these being available for long. I, in the meantime, will settle for a Concorde sticker on the back of a late 90s Jaguar, and keep hoping for the future.

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