THE LATE BRAKING INTERVIEW: JAMIE CHADWICK

We have a chat with the first female ever and youngest winner of the British GT Championship.

2y ago

8.7K

Chadwick started her motorsport career in kart racing at a young age of 13. She broke into car racing in 2013 when she turned down a trial with the England under-18 hockey team to compete at the Ginetta Junior scholarship weekend, where she triumphed to win a scholarship for the 2013 Ginetta Junior Championship season. She remained in the series for 2014, taking five podium finishes during the year to finish eighth overall in the championship. Thank god this blog is about racing and not hockey eh?

In 2015, Chadwick won the British GT Championship GT4 class with Beechdean Motorsport, partnering with Ross Gunn for Beechdean Motorsport in their Aston Martin V8 Vantage. Between them they managed two wins, including the Silverstone Dunlop Britcar 24 Hour race, making Chadwick the youngest winner of a 24-hour race. In 2017, Chadwick moved into single seater racing, competing in the British Formula 3 championship for Double R Racing.

Doing that professional unveiling thing.

Doing that professional unveiling thing.

Here at Late Braking, the three of us managed to catch up with Jamie and ask her a few questions for what is surely going to be an important season for the youngster.

LB:

Who inspired you to start racing?

JC:

I fell into motorsport by accident to be honest, I didn’t really know a huge amount about the sport before I first went karting so I didn’t have any one who inspired me to get into it. I went karting because my older brother had been a couple of times and kept coming home telling everyone how good he was, so I wanted to give it a go and beat him. I suppose you could say my brother inspired me to start racing as the sibling rivalry kicked in, it was further down the line when I started to look at racing role models to gain inspiration.

LB:

After a successful year in British F3 in 2017 what are your goals for 2018?

JC:

2017 went well, we achieved everything we set out to achieve and we were really happy with the way that the season went. After my first taste of success in 2015 my goal for next season in British F3 is to be at the front, winning races and challenging for the championship now that I have had more experience in the car and on the circuits.

LB:

You are a fantastic ambassador to women in motorsport, what advice would you give to young girls who are looking to forge a career in the motorsport industry?

JC:

For me I would say you should just go for it, work hard and persevere. It is a male dominated sport but when you get involved in it and it is something that you love you don’t think about the men around you as you are just enjoying being there. For me, I got into it when I was young so I didn’t even think about being one of the very few females around. I did it purely because I enjoyed it and I wanted to win races. If you have an interest just get involved and commit to it as there is nothing stopping you from achieving your dreams. If you haven’t already given it a go there are so many great karting tracks around the UK, there are loads of places which you can google and try it for yourself. If more young girls decided to give motorsport a go there is no doubt that there will be many more talented females that are out there who have the ability to make it to the top.

LB:

You have driven and raced quite a variety of machinery throughout your career so far, which series have you enjoyed the most and how have you felt this variety has helped you as a driver?

JC:

I have been really lucky throughout my relatively short racing career as I have managed to drive some awesome cars and for me that’s what it is all about. I like driving cars and I like racing and to have the opportunity to drive and race so many is really cool. It would be difficult to pinpoint one but one of the big points which was a big achievement was when I drove on the Nordschleife in Germany. I did it on a factory support deal with Aston Martin which in itself was really special and to get my permit to race on the Nordschleife which is such an iconic track and to it’s unbelievable. Single seaters cars are also an incredible piece of kit and nothing really compares to going around Spa-Francochamps and Silverstone in an F3 either. I did say it was hard to pick one but the Nordschleife is my favourite track and with the car I drove out there, the Aston Martin Vantage GT8, was pretty cool too.

LB:

What is your favourite circuit?

JC:

In terms of what I raced last year in British F3 I think Spa-Francochamps has to be up there. Its iconic and incredible in a single seater and travelling out there with the history of the place is unbelievable but in terms of circuits which you don’t get to race on much I answered that in the question before – definitely the Nordschleife. It is another league, literally like a rollercoaster, I don’t think anyone can experience the same feelings at any other circuit it’s that special.

LB:

If you could race alongside any Formula 1 race driver, past or present, who will it be?

JC:

That’s a great question. I think any driver wants to put themselves up against the best and compare themselves against the best so you know when or if you beat them that you’re doing the best job possible. Therefore, I would want to go against the best driver in the world, which at the moment is Lewis Hamilton. He may be in the best car in the world but I want to be in the same kit as him and know that I can beat him on merit. In the past there are so many I would have loved to have gone up against in the cars that they drove back then. So overall it is hard to pinpoint but for now to go up against Lewis Hamilton in an equal opportunity, it would be pretty cool.

LB:

What has been your best late braking overtake?

JC:

I would say my best late brake overtake was a move that I did when I was racing in British GT. During the first round of British GT I was very much in Ginetta Junior mindset that any car in front of me was there to overtake even though British GT was an hour long and Ginetta was only 15 minutes. I still felt the need that I had to get past them in the next corner so I was making my way through the traffic in the second half of the race and came from six car lengths back in the Foggety chicane and managed to make that stick and it was in front of the Aston boss which was nice as well.

LB:

If you weren’t a racing driver what would you be?

JC:

Definitely something in sport. It is very vague answer I know but before I got behind the wheel I wanted to be an athlete in every other sport that I was involved in . I wanted to be the best in whatever I participated in whether I was skiing, playing hockey or riding. It didn’t matter what it was I wanted to be the best at it and be a professional, so my answer would have to be an athlete or sports performer in another sport.

LB:

What would you say is your best race?

JC:

Quite a few stand out, the ones where you win races and have success or stand out are great but in terms of the actual best race it would probably be Spa in 2017 in Formula 3. It’s very difficult to overtake in Formula 3 cars because of the aero but Spa opens itself up with a slipstream for a lot of overtaking. I started 9th and was up to 5th after the first lap and then battled for the whole race for positions between fourth and eighth, so it was a really fun race for me and it definitely stands out. I ended up in fifth or sixth but it’s competitiveness was a highlight for me and it was some of the most excitement that I have had in a race car.

LB:

Do you have any quirky or specific pre-race routines?

JC:

I don’t. I always think of something and if I have a good race I tell myself it was that, but when I next race I can’t remember what it was! It doesn’t help that I am useless at keeping routines. Last season I had a few little things that I like to do whether it was in my warm up or what I would eat, I always have porridge on the morning of a race or test. Porridge is key. It is the only thing I like to eat altogether in the morning. I also like to have naps where possible during track days, if we arrive at 7-8am in the morning and may still be there at 7-8pm at night. When you’re racing first thing in the morning and another one in the evening you have a lot of time in the middle and when your brain is ticking over I like to switch off for a bit. A good 20 minute nap in the back of a truck is always underrated. So I enjoy a nap and some porridge, but if these are good rituals I do not know.

LB:

Who do you think is going to win the 2018 Formula 1 competition?

JC:

It depends on what the cars are like next year, as at the moment I can’t see Mercedes dominance being threatened and with that in mind it would have to be Lewis Hamilton with his form. I would love to see the Red Bull drivers pushing up, especially now they have the Aston Martin link. It would be great to see them at the forefront as they have two of the most talented drivers on the grid, in Daniel Riccardio and Verstappen. I would love to see those two fighting for it but realistically I can’t see past Lewis Hamilton, which is also good as he is a British driver that is having such great success.

A huge thanks must be given to Jamie for answering our questions and speaking with us in what must be a hugely busy schedule. Make sure to follow Jamie on Twitter to keep up with her progress during 2018!

Loading...

Join In

Comments (3)

  • Think there’s a typo in the last answer it says ‘I would be great to see‘ and I think it should be ‘it’

      2 years ago
  • Does anyone ever edit these posts? If not, you seriously need one. It’s “late braking” not “late breaking”.

    You can tell you guys are amateurs

      2 years ago
Loading...
Loading...
3