- Photo credits Toyota

The new Toyota Prius will arrive in 2022 and will be powered by hydrogen

Hybrid and plug-in hybrid models will still be available

3w ago
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Marketed since 2016, the fourth-gen Toyota Prius has not aged a bit and its design is still very distinctive. But faced with the SUV wave, the car is undoubtedly losing ground, especially in the United States. As a result, it will be handed over to a brand new generation next year.

According to the Japanese website BestCarWeb, the all-new Prius will arrive in December 2022 and will remain a hybrid. Hybrid and plug-in hybrid versions will therefore be renewed. However, the magazine announces a major novelty: the Prius 5 will also have a new hydrogen powertrain.

However, we will have to be very patient as this version will arrive three years after the hybrid models. The technology is still new and complex and will require a considerable amount of development time before it can be put into production. The Japanese brand is already undertaking tests on a Corolla Sport equipped with the 1.6-litre engine common to the demonic GR Yaris.

The Prius is still not going to be fully electrified and this reinforces Toyota's desire to invest massively in hydrogen. The brand's CEO, Akio Toyoda, has repeatedly told the international press that all-electric is not a viable solution in the long term.

Photo credits Toyota

Photo credits Toyota

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Comments (38)

  • We need more infrastructure for Hydrogen fuel cells to be viable. Here is hoping Toyota can help get that to happen.

      24 days ago
    • Yeah, in my opinion is hydrogen a far better alternative for fossil fuel than electric cars could ever be.

        23 days ago
    • Just keep in mind that BEVs will never work in heavy trucking.

      Hydrogen is a beautiful solution (as it is in aviation)--

      Annddddd,

      Read more
        21 days ago
  • Little do some of you know that hydrogen cars have been proven to be the least efficient way of power and they still cost a fortune to fuel up. Also they still use electric motors only not a battery, hydrogen fuel cells instead. Hydrogen cars will likely never be as capable performance wise as petrol, diesel and electric cars and if they will be, it will take years.

      21 days ago
    • But they still help the environment in there own way, they produce water as a kind of exhaust gas like co2 from ICE cars and they seem a better idea than electric cars. All cars harm the environment, Iโ€™m not saying hydrogen all the way even...

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        21 days ago
    • your opinion?

        21 days ago
  • The Prius finally wonโ€™t sell well ๐Ÿฅณ

      22 days ago
  • Yeh, yeh, yeh... only Japan has any kind of hydrogen fuelling structure at all, and even then EVs have hardly taken hold, hybrid or otherwise. Apparently, after Hokashima nuclear accident, with the consequent loss of electricity supplies, most Japanese have returned to fossil fuelled vehicles. Possibly because of tectonic action that occurs frequently in Japan, the construction of wind turbines and other green-energy production has never taken off as it has in most other first world nations. We need to note that despite all their brouh-ha-ha about hydrogen, both Toyota and Honda are both manufacturing pure EVs already. I believe that for locally important reasons, both businesses have invested very heavily in the 'wrong horse', but it has been pointed out by experts in that field that both manufacturers spend a large amount of R&D in developing competing technology in order not to be caught out when change comes about. Perhaps we need to take this announcement with a pinch of salt and just look at the real world about us, before getting excited by a car we cannot actually fill with energy. There are many reasons why PHEVS and hydrogen fuelled vehicles are not the future. The laws of thermodynamics, complexity, production costs and the multinational climate-change group of leading scientists and institutions, who inform us that ONLY pure electric vehicles, powered by totally green energy (and not cycling CO2) can help us halt climate change and keep our planet from exceeding (I think) 2.5 degrees centigrade average temperature increase. It doesn't seem like much, does it? The consequences, however, are truly catastrophic, so let us smile at Toyota and ignore their marketing bollox.

      22 days ago
    • I think it is too early to call Toyotaโ€™s strategy a poor choice. Granted EV has a significant jump on FCV, we cannot underestimate one important factor running parallel to all this. As the oil-and-gas industry struggles to secure its place...

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        21 days ago
    • I'm afraid it's already too late. Those pesky laws of thermodynamics make the process rather inefficient and the assumption that only pure water is a byproduct is also flawed, because real world. Nitrates are one of the byproducts besides...

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        21 days ago
  • The problem is that Toyota is one of a few automakers who makes a hydrogen car and seems to not care that it simply cannot be owned outside of California. If they think that hydrogen is the future then they need to put their money where their mouth is and invest in hydrogen stations

      21 days ago
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