- Porsche.com

The Porsche Taycan is one of the least efficient EVs the EPA has ever tested

With a 201 mile range and just 69 MPGe, the Taycan miserably failed the EPA test

41w ago

2.4K

If you are going to make a serious Tesla rival (or a serious electric car, period), range needs to be high on your list. With that in mind, Porsche used an all new, specialized EV architecture for the Taycan, an 800-volt battery pack (as opposed to the normal 400) and other tweaks to make it go as far as possible on a single charge. And the end result? 201 miles of range and 69 MPGe. Or, to put it another way, 3 fewer miles of range and 5 fewer MPGe than Audi managed with a 400-volt battery stuck into a converted gas-engine platform, on a car that weighs nearly 1,000 pounds more than the Taycan. And even more significantly, that's nearly 200 fewer miles than the top spec Tesla Model S--a car that is nearly $60,000 less than the starting price of the Taycan Turbo that performed the test--and that's before you factor in Porsche's famously expensive option pricing. At the risk of stating the obvious, this is disastrous for the Taycan, and could sink its chance at luring away Tesla buyers.

Actually, let's be fair about this. The Taycan is not the least efficient production EV the EPA has ever tested. There are two that score lower than the Taycan: the 2001 Th!nk City Car (not a typo) and the 1999 GM EV-1. Also, the 2000 Toyota RAV4 EV, converted from a now-20 year old car with now-20 year old battery technology, only scored 3 more MPGe than the brand-new, purpose-built, top of the line, $152,000 Porsche electric car. Oh. When I say it like that it sounds even worse.

Porsche, understandably, were horrified at the results, and got a fuel-economy testing organization called the AMCI to do their own tests. They achieved a combined 275 miles of range--but I personally would take that with a grain of salt until it can be confirmed by buyers.

When the Taycan came out, I thought it would be the first serious competitor to the Tesla Model S. As it turns out, though, I was wrong. The first serious competitor, it seems, is still yet to come. Maybe Audi will have better luck with this platform?

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Comments (39)

  • Tesla remains ahead of the pack. They’re quite good at progressing their technology on a regular basis. Porsche just joined the race and are currently years behind. The Taycan is one heck of a start however.

      9 months ago
    • I just don't think Porsche is even trying with the range on this one. The VW ID 3 costs about 100 grand less, and has about 100 more miles of range

        9 months ago
    • I just remembered that the methods of testing range are different in Europe and America.

        9 months ago
  • It looks beautiful

      9 months ago
  • Not a single Taycan buyer cares about its range.

      9 months ago
    • Why would they not? One of the single biggest obstacles to widespread EV acceptance is range anxiety. Every time you read a review about an electric car, the reviewer is bound to mention the range at least once before the article's halfway...

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        9 months ago
    • Porsche buyers aren't "most electric car buyers". They don't care about such trivial things and as proof of that European preorders have already exceeded 30,000 units. ...

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        9 months ago
  • I don't understand the methodology behind all these companies now delivering EV's. Apart from the i-Pace it appears that 200 is what they're all aiming for. Audi, Porsche and rumors that Mercedes is going to come close to this range also is really strange given the fiercest competitor is leagues ahead of them on range. What were they doing all these years in the R&D department? Surely they have to be embarrassed that a company as young as Tesla is annihilating them on range.

    Audi was completely arrogant and said "most people only average 50 miles a day" so to them it's an acceptable excuse to have such an inefficient car but the stigma with EV's is the range and no matter how you try an tailor a marketing campaign to say something different it clearly doesn't work when you look at the made to order e-Trons all sitting on dealer lots due to people cancelling and such low sales.

      9 months ago
    • Yeah. If they don't do it right, then there's no point in doing it at all, and they will all collapse when the world goes electric. How many horse-drawn carraige-makers are still around from the 1800s?

        9 months ago
    • I suspect it’s a question of what they can deliver with their existing battery and electric motor technology. Tesla has been developing these for over a decade now, and as a result are far more efficient than the established manufacturers...

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        9 months ago
  • How is the voltage relevant here? All it does is increase the potential charging speed. What matters for range is the capacity of the battery in kWh.

    But yes, the Taycan is monstrously inefficient. 201 miles on a 90kWh battery implies 450Wh/mile, That compared to an EPA range of 373 miles with a 100kWh battery pack on the Model S Performance, which implies 270Wh/mile.

    That means the Taycan uses nearly two thirds more energy per mile than the Model S, despite the Model S having more powerful motors. That is just shocking.

      9 months ago
    • I thought increased voltage usually meant a longer range, as well as faster charging times.

        9 months ago
    • Higher voltage also means less weight.

      Power = Current times voltage (P=I*V) this is the equation for power of the machine.

      From this you can see that if voltage goes up, current must come down for a given power.

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        9 months ago
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