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The story behind: My Torino

I'm gonna start at the very beginning. No not from the start of my ownership, but when the car was built. It's a truly special thing, knowing the exact time and date when your car was brought to life. It sort of makes them alive, living and breathing. And since our cars are so important for us and indeed an expression of our personalities, it's important for us to make this connection.

Hideaway headlights - a thing of the past. To me, it's a part of what makes the car awesome.

This story starts on October 29th when Ford's Atlanta plant sets off to build this very car - 4 days ahead of schedule. The car is destined to a North Carolina dealer as a "Fleet B" order. The B (and A for that matter) where quick-orders. A ready set of selected options. Made for easier ordering-methods for dealers. The B suggests the car to be delivered with AM/FM radio, Power-assisted brakes with front discs, power steering and A/C. Further more, the dealer opted for the Brougham model (the upscale, plush and luxury version of the Torino), the step-up 351 Cleveland 2V 250 hp V8 mated to a C4 automatic transmission, feeding a 9" Conventional differential (read open...) with a 3.00:1 ratio. Some controvercary surrounds one of its greates features - the hideaway headlights. Some say it was optinal on the Brougham. some say it was standard on both the Brougham and the Squire (Wagon and Ranchero). The dealer-brochures state they were standard, so I'll go with that. And it's a fantastic piece - to me it sort of makes the car. It certainly made me want the darn thing. Furthermore she is one of 14 543 Torino Brougham 4-door hardtops made for 1970. Of those, 905 were pastel blue with blue vinyl tops. Mine WAS one of those. It has since been repainted and had is roof-coverings removed.

It's a truly special thing, knowing the exact time and date when your car was brought to life. It sort of makes them alive, living and breathing.

- Christopher Skjæveland

A fender-badge and a wheel.

Its life in North Carolina is unknown, other than the rust it accumulated while staying there. in 2002 some other Norwegian saw it and brought it over seas, drove it as is for 7 years before he sent it to Poland for some "restoration" (repaint, minor rust repair and some other work including an intake and carb swap to edelbrock performer intake and 4 barrel carb.). The car stayed with this owner until I bought it on the 15th of June 2012, a couple of months before my 25th birthday.

Why did I buy it? Well, I've wanted an american muscle car for as long as I can remember. a ride in a '69 Corvette with sidepipes at the age of 15 comfirmed that lust. I spent the next 10 years with a bad case of OCD (Obsessive Challenger Disorder) only wanting a '70 Challenger. But as life wants it - they were out of my price range and I had to make other priorities.... In the meantime I had a bunch of other classics, mainly european. But they didn't really "cut the mustard". Someting was missing. Something V8. Over the years I spammed my father with these "great delas" for Challengers, but he didn't lift an eyebrow. In fact he got quite bored with it. And after a few failed attempts to make me widen my horizon, I finally got my eyes open and started looking for alternatives. Since my budget was limited (at best, most of it was borrowed from my father) I had to set some criterias to go by. I wanted an american car with a V8 from '69-'70. I could go for a '74 and up too, but all I could find in my range were shabby GM F-bodies and a couple of 318-powered Mopars (a '76 Dart, a '78 LeBaron, and a '77 Cordoba). Neither gave me the fizz I was craving. I had to find something that "floated my boat". By standing hard on the "1970" model year, I had to think and look outside the box. That ment the undawnting 4-door territory... For many an achilles heel or even... a wort... in the face.... with hair on it...

Oh the amount of DOORS!!!

I couldn't care less... The Torino 2-door and 4-door cars are built on the same platform. Same wheelbase. Same engine-options. Everything is pretty much the same, save for a few details (roof-line, some glass, trim etc). So why should I be bothered by the number of doors? I shouldn't and I'm not. My torino has a party piece - it's a 4 door hardtop. That means it lacks a B-post. And that means when you crank the windows down, you're left with a HUUUUGE open space once occupied by windows. It's like a 2-door hardtop - on steroids!

Why did I buy it? Well, I've wanted an american muscle car for as long as I can remember. a ride in a '69 Corvette with sidepipes at the age of 15 comfirmed that lust

- Christopher Skjæveland

What's not to like? It's easier to get my kids in and out of. It's perfect for weddings (I've done 5 since 2013) and a fantastic car to burble along in. The hideaways give it that sinister look of a proper muscle car. Add in the delicious burble of the true dual exhaust and the low down grunt of that 351 V8 and what you're left with is a truely remarkeble car. In my eyes, a muscle car.

I had to think and look outside the box. That ment the undawnting 4-door territory... For many an achilles heel or even... a wort... in the face.... with hair on it...

- Christopher Skjæveland

Curb-appeal

I had to think and look outside the box. That ment the undawnting 4-door territory... For many an achilles heel or even... a wort... in the face.... with hair on it...

- Christopher Skjæveland

I can't praise my father enough for making me think outside the box and finding a fantastic car. Don't set your sights on a car that's way out of your league, even if it's momentary out of reach (by that I mean 10-20 years which is nothing in the car-world). Don't keep yourself from having automotive fun just because of a dream car - find something to have fun with in the meantime. And maybe you will, like me, find a new dream car right in front of you. - Happy Motoring!

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