Vision or madness: Opel RAK

1w ago

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Credit: Estaticos.sport.es

Can you imagine how courageous or rather insane do you have to be to put few rockets on a car...in 1928? Well, the brave man I'm going to tell you about was Fritz von Opel, grandson of the company founder Adam Opel. He was aiming to break the land speed record, earning his nickname "Rocket Fritz".

Opel RAK.1. Credit: FavCars.com

It all started when a writer, astronomer and a test pilot Max Valier came up with the idea of rocket cars. He then hired Opel car company to test his idea, and the man in charge would be the young Fritz. People in Opel started some serious research, and the rocket maker Sander supplied them with solid-fuel rockets, which were very revolutionary at the time.

Opel RAK.1. Credit: Otherdrive.blogspot.com

The first test car was called RAK (short from Rakettenwagen), and it was tested on 11th April 1928 in Rüsselsheim. The test drive went great and the car reached 125 km/h in just 10 seconds. People were amazed by this achievement, but Fritz wasn't so impressed. He believed that he could reach higher speeds, but he needed to change some things on his car.

Opel Rak.2. Credit: FavCars.com

Since the track in Rüsselsheim wasn't long enough to achieve any higher speeds, they needed to find a more appropriate test ground. So, they went to Berlin to the famous Avus track. At the end of the May 1928, over 3.000 people went there to see the new monster Fritz created-the RAK.2, which had 24 solid-fuel rockets generating 6 tons of thrust.

Auv track. Credit: en.espn.co.uk

The 22-years-old Fritz sat behind the wheel of his latest creation and started to ignite the rockets one by one. He accelerated with an insane speed and the car was going faster and faster with every rocket he ignited. Despite having wins on the car, the front wheels lost grip, but Fritz's fast maneuvering saved him, and he held the car on the track. When the test was finally over, Fritz entered history books having reached 238 km/h.

Opel RAK.2 starting its test run. Credit: Newsweek.ro

The public was simply mind blown by this stunt and company got a great reputation. People were quite intrigued by his test cars, and many were wondering if rocket-powered cars were the next chapter in automotive history. The young driver never gave up on that idea, and started doing more tests. Only a month after he achieved the land speed record, he broke another record with the RAK.3, which was a driverless rail-car. He wanted to make it even faster, but the new test car exploded during the top speed run.

Opel RAK.3 rail-car. Credit: AutoPortal.hr

After he was done with cars, Fritz von Opel started another project involving rocket power, this time on airplanes. The project didn't look very promising, but on 30th September 1929 Fritz gathered the media to show them his new vision-the Opel-Sander RAK.1 plane. His first two attempts didn't go well, but his 3rd attempt went down in history as the first successful flight of a rocket-powered plane. His highest speed was 100 km/h, which was enough to pilot over 1.5 km in 75 seconds.

Opel-Sanders RAK.1 plane. Credit: Motor1.com

That flight meant everything to him, and he wanted to continue applying rocket fuel to similar stuff. Unfortunately, his vision of rocket-powered vehicles was brought to end by the Great Depression. To celebrate this great visionary, Opel made a replica of Fritz's RAK.1 plane, and presented it on the 70th anniversary of his historic flight.

Credit: Motor1.com

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Comments (6)
  • I can only imagine how terrifying that would have felt and sounded. What a man.

    5 days ago
    1 Bump
  • It was such magnificent madness! Not quite rocket engines, but people are still experimenting with pulse jet cars.

    6 days ago
    1 Bump
  • A wonderful article!

    8 days ago
    2 Bumps
  • Cool article, great read

    8 days ago
    3 Bumps
  • Until I read this I never knew about Fritz von Opel or of his desire to have rocket propelled modes of transport. He was quiet a pioneer back in those days and unfortunately we will never know what else he would have acheived had he continued....

    8 days ago
    2 Bumps

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